Ph.D. student and postdoc positions in evolutionary genomics of ants at the University of Haifa, Israel.

NSF-BSF funded positions for a Ph.D. student and a postdoc are available in the Privman lab at the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Israel. The lab studies evolutionary genomics of social behavior in ants, employing tools from population genomics, genomic mapping, and phylogenomics. Ongoing research includes several projects combining population sampling, behavioral experiments, chemical analysis of pheromones, genomic sequencing, and computational analysis (see http://privman.haifa.ac.il/).
The new positions will be funded by an NSF-BSF grant for a collaboration with the group of Prof. Deborah Gordon at Stanford University. The project aims to unravel the genomic basis of social evolution, focusing on foraging behavior in variable climate conditions. The successful candidates will work in collaboration with teammates from both labs, to contribute to any or all stages of the research, including behavioral and genomic surveys, laboratory procedures and computational analyses. The research plan includes genomic sequencing of hundreds of samples, population genomic and genomic mapping analyses. The genomic work will be conducted in Haifa, using a liquid handling robot for both DNA extraction and genomic library construction. The analysis of the genomic sequencing data will also be conducted in Haifa, using our high-performance computer cluster. Therefore, candidates should have experience and/or motivation to learn genomics and bioinformatics. All the necessary protocols and knowhow for both molecular lab and bioinformatics procedures are already well established in the Privman lab.
The Institute of Evolution offers a supportive, dynamic, diverse, multicultural and multilingual working environment. The Institute hosts research groups working on a diverse, interdisciplinary spectrum of topics in ecology and evolution (see http://evolution.haifa.ac.il/). Students will have access to leading researchers with expertise in ecology and evolution, population genetics, phylogenetics and molecular evolution, as well as genomics and bioinformatics, including genomic mapping. Professional training opportunities in these fields are available in the Institute, the University of Haifa, and in other Israeli institutes, including advanced courses, workshops and conferences. Although the common language in Israel is Hebrew, there are many foreign researchers and students in the Institute and all activities are conducted in English, including seminars, advanced courses, workshops and conferences. The Institute offers state-of-the-art facilities and professional support for molecular biology research in general and genomics in particular, as well as a high-performance computer cluster for bioinformatic analysis.
Please send your application to Dr. Eyal Privman: eprivman@univ.haifa.ac.il
Informal inquiries are also welcome.
The application should include a cover letter with a short description of research experience, research interests, and why you are interested to join our lab, your CV, and the contact details of 2-3 referees.

Offre de thèse : navigation des bourdons à Bielefed

Your Tasks

You will work as an Early Stage Reseacher in the following research groups:

  • the Neurobiology Lab, Bielefeld (Prof. Martin Egelhaaf)
  • the Behavioural and Cognitive Ecology Lab, Toulouse (Dr. Mathieu Lihoreau)

The tasks are performed both at the University of Bielefeld (Germany) and in the cooperation laboratory in Toulouse (France).

 

Project description:

How animals acquire, process and combine information about the world to navigate accurately is a fundamental question in biology. The challenge of navigation may appear even more impressive when considering flying insects. A foraging bee, for instance, must search for flowers over vast territories, learn their locations and establish efficient paths between them before relocating the nest to unload food.
As an Early Stage Researcher you will combine novel technologies to investigate the importance of flying altitude in solving challenging 3 D navigational tasks. (100 %)
We offer an international work environment and the opportunity to do a doctorate in the research project.

 

Your Profile

We expect

  • highly motivated candidate with a relevant completed university degree (e. Master Sc.) in biology, neuroscience or any related subjects
  • interest in insect navigation and cognition and neuroethology
  • advanced knowledge in at least one programming language (“Python” preferred)
  • excellent academic track-record
  • theoretical knowledge and in-depth practical experience with animal behaviour
  • fluent English language skills (written and oral)
  • mobility

Preferable qualifications

  • knowledge in German and French language (written and oral)

 

Remuneration

Salary will be paid according to Remuneration level 13 of the Wage Agreement for Public Service in the Federal States (TV-L). As stipulated in § 2 (1) sentence 1 of the WissZeitVG (fixed-term employment), the contract will end after three years. In accordance with the provisions of the WissZeitVG and the Agreement on Satisfactory Conditions of Employment, the length of contract may differ in individual cases. The employment is designed to encourage further academic qualification. The position is advertised as 65 % part-time job. In individual cases, this percentage may be reduced on request, as long as this does not conflict with official needs.
Bielefeld University is particularly committed to equal opportunities and the career development of its employees. It offers attractive internal and external training and further training programmes. Employees have the opportunity to use a variety of health, counselling, and prevention programmes. Bielefeld University places great importance on a work- family balance for all its employees.

 

Application Procedure

For full consideration, your application should be received via either post (see postal address below) or email (a single PDF) document sent to olivier.bertrand@uni-bielefeld.de by May 15th, 2020. Please mark your application with the identification code: wiss20061. Please do not use application portfolios and send only photocopies of original documents because all application materials will be destroyed at the end of the selection procedure.

Further information on Bielefeld University can be found on our homepage at www.uni-bielefeld.de. Please note that the possibility of privacy breaches and unauthorized access by third parties cannot be excluded when communicating via unencrypted e-mail. Information on the processing of personal data is available https://www.uni- bielefeld.de/Universitaet/Aktuelles/Stellenausschreibungen/2019_DS-Hinweise_englisch.pdf.

 

Postal Address
Universität Bielefeld
Fakultät für Biologie, Bereich Neurobiologie Herrn Dr. Olivier Bertrand
P.O. Box: 10 01 31 33501 Bielefeld Germany

Contact
Name: Dr. Olivier Bertrand Phone: +49 521 106-5575
Email: olivier.bertrand@uni-bielefeld.de

Offre de thèse : IPHC-CNRS (STRASBOURG) and the Institut COCHIN – INSB (PARIS)

DEADLINE: 30 JUNE 2020 for applications. A shortlist of 5 applicants will be established shortly and interviews realized in the first 15 days of July.

 

Same Mitochondria, Different Longevities: What Do Ants Tell Us About Metabolic Ageing? a Project Coupling Evolutionary Biology to Cellular Bioenergetics

 

Key-words : Ageing ; Evolution ; Mitochondria ; Bioenergetics ; Ants ; Proteomics ; Molecular biology

 

Ants offer an exciting scientific opportunity for the study of ageing processes since these animals have evolved a striking variability of longevities both among species but also within a species among different castes. Shorter lifespan should be associated with a faster progression of age-linked profiles of physiological traits.

 

In accordance, ants have been used in previous studies to evaluate how the accumulation of damages with age, antioxidant capacities or telomere dynamics may explain ants’ longevity, producing mixed support for the Reactive Oxygen Species or Disposable Soma theories. For example, queens do not show longer telomeres (a determinant of cell lifespan and individual survival) than short-lived workers (females), but do so with short-lived males, suggesting that beyond telomere length, additional cell signalling pathways may be of key importance in queen longevity determination. Energy metabolism and metabolic rate are also considered as essential components of the ageing equation with impact on longevity, shortly stated as « live fast die young ». Mitochondrion is by far the main energy provider for animal cells and also controls redox homeostasis including reactive oxygen generation/disposal.

 

The question is therefore if/how the longer longevity of certain castes/individuals is associated with biochemical/molecular differences that could be considered as causatives: mitochondrial efficiency, antioxidant levels or telomere dynamics. Are they modified when a worker role changes, switching her ageing phenotype from a low to a fast rate? This raises the question of the influence of social context on individual senescence? One requisite is to access to ant’s bioenergetics both at the level of individuals and of mitochondria. Methodological issues will need to be addressed, our first experiments showed that respiration of ants is detected in the high-resolution respirometer (O2k Oroboros instruments). In contrast, classical extraction protocols used on vertebrate organs/cells did not yield preparation in which the biochemical activity ant’s mitochondria could be measured. New protocols will have to be invented. We know how to deal with limiting the amount of starting material: the extremely sensitive luciferase reaction (luminescence) is used to monitor ATP production rate and flow cytometry to evaluate membrane potential or ROS generation at the level of single mitochondria. To complete the picture of mitochondrial-derived associated ageing signalling pathways (e.g. Bax/Bak, CytC, caspases…) proteomic experiments will be settled.

 

In this context, we want to develop a new research project in the emerging field of socio-bioenergetics, which unifies the co-evolution of social organization with ageing processes using bioenergetics and molecular methodologies.

 

The present PhD project addresses the evolutionary mystery of the « ant same mitochondria but astonishing different longevities within a species », by merging two teams with complementary skills and knowledge. The Ecology, Physiology and Ethology department of the Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien will bring its knowledge in evolutionary trade-offs bases and mechanisms of ageing and its presently running ants’ captive colonies. The Physiology and Evolutionary Physiology team (http://www.iphc.cnrs.fr/-Ethologie-et-Physiologie-Evolutive-EPE-.html) focuses on how animals cope with trade-offs (physiology and behavioural mechanisms) and what are the fitness consequences (Evolution). This will be completed by the state-to-the-art bioenergetics approaches of the team Mitochondria, Bioenergetic, Metabolism and Signalization of the Institut Cochin (https://www.institutcochin.fr/la-recherche/emd/equipe-bouillaud).

 

Expected skills:

The PhD candidate will be shared by the IPHC and the Cochin Institute, with a consequent work using mitochondrial bioenergetics protocols which needs a substantial background in laboratory work. Thus, we are seeking for a student with a large background in energetics/molecular biology, who will be trained with evolutionary biology questioning and interpretation of the results. He will be based during the first year at the Cochin Institute (Paris), working under the supervision of Dr F Bouillaud, doing mainly methodological set-up devoted to the measurement of ants’ mitochondria bioenergetics. The second and third years are planned to be in Strasbourg, but schedule may change in relation to the project advancement.

 

Acquired expertise:

The PhD candidate will become an expert in:

– Bioenergetics applied to insects

– Evolutionary biology of ants

– Evolutionary biology theories of ageing

– Mixed models’ statistics

– Methodological skills: mitochondrial respiration methodology, qPCR, introduction in proteomics, statistics, scientific writing, project management, communication skills.

 

Salary:

The project is funded by a CNRS- Interdisciplinary Mission grant of 17 keuros for functioning and a PhD allowance of ca. 1700 euros (before taxes) per month for three years (2020-2023), starting next October. The PhD contract will provide access to the French social security. Possibilities of teaching at the University of Strasbourg are open, with substantial income gain. The PhD will be hosted by the doctoral school of the University of Strasbourg (ED 414), and then will have to fulfil all the training obligatory for each PhD (54h in total), mostly provided by the University (French lessons, animal care training, animal ethics…). The IPHC and Cochin research teams are friendly and international and non-French speaking applicants are welcome.

 

Contacts:

François Criscuolo, IPHC-CNRS, francois.criscuolo@iphc.cnrs.fr, http://www.iphc.cnrs.fr/-Ethologie-et-Physiologie-Evolutive-EPE-.html

Frédéric Bouillaud, Institut Cochin INSB-CNRS, frederic.bouillaud@inserm.fr, https://www.institutcochin.fr/la-recherche/emd/equipe-bouillaud

Fabrice Bertile, IPHC-CNRS, fbertile@unistra.fr, http://www.iphc.cnrs.fr/-Spectrometrie-de-Masse-BioOrganique-LSMBO-.html

Offre de thèse : Régulation et dynamique de la signature chimique chez les insectes sociaux

Nom du directeur de thèse: Eric Darrouzet

Équipe ESORE(IRBI UMR CNRS 7261)

Filière de rattachement:SSBCVE

mail de l’encadrant:eric.darrouzet@univ-tours.fr

Date limite de candidature:10 juin 2020

 

La cuticule des insectes est couverte d’un ensemble de composés lipidiques, notamment des hydrocarbures (CHCs). Ces molécules sont à la base des phénomènes de reconnaissance inter-et intra-spécifiques, et de fait, permettent d’assurer la cohésion sociale au sein des colonies d’insectes sociaux.Il existe un lien fort entre des comportements sociaux chez ces insectes et leurs profils cuticulaire en CHCs. Par exemple, la signature chimique est à la base de la perception de l’identité coloniale au sein d’une même espèce, de l’identité de caste et de sexe au sein d’une même colonie, voire même des tâches spécifiques réalisées par les individus. Cette signature chimique peut varier selon des facteurs endogènes, comme le taux de certaines hormones, l’âge ou la fonction des insectes, mais aussi selon des facteurs exogènes, comme le climat,la saison, l’alimentation ou le temps. De facto, cette signature peut être modulée en fonction de ces divers paramètres et est donc sous le contrôle de facteurs de régulation.Le but de la thèse sera d’analyser d’une part cette dynamique de la signature chimique chez des insectes sociaux et d’étudier d’autre part son contrôle endocrine par une hormone clé de la physiologie des insectes qu’est l’hormone juvénile.

Les hydrocarbures cuticulaires (CHCs) tapissent la surface des insectes. Outre leur fonction de barrière chimique contre la dessiccation (Gibbs and Rajpurohit, 2010), ces molécules sont à la base des phénomènes de reconnaissance inter-et intra-spécifiques (Blomquist & Bagnères, 2010). De fait, elles représentent un réel système de communication chimique qui participe grandement àla cohésion sociale au sein des colonies d’insectes sociaux(termites, abeilles, fourmis, guêpes…). De nombreux travaux scientifiques ont montré le lien fort qui existe entre des comportements sociaux chez ces insectes et leur signature chimique (profils cuticulaire en CHCs) (Blomquist & Howard, 2005). Les CHCs sont impliqués par exemple dans les phénomènes de perception de l’identité coloniale au sein d’une même espèce, mais aussi de l’identité de caste et de sexe au sein d’une même colonie (Blomquist & Bagnères, 2010), voire même des tâches réalisées par les individus (Rahman et al, 2016). Cette signature chimique composée par les CHCs peut varier selon des facteurs endogènes, comme le taux de certaines hormones (Darrouzet et al, 2014; Leniaud et al, 2011; Lengyel et al.2007; Schal et al.2003), l’âge ou la fonction des insectes (Rahman et al, 2016), mais aussi des facteurs exogènes, comme le climat et la saison (Bagnères et al.1990), l’alimentation (Liang and Silverman 2000) ou le temps (Bagnères et al., 2011).

Deux questions principales seront étudiées dans le cadre du sujet de thèse proposé:l’aspect modulaire et le contrôle endocrine de la signature chimique chez des insectes sociaux.-Régulation hormonale de la signature chimique. Plusieurs travaux ont montré que l’hormone juvénile (JH) intervenait lors de la différenciation des castes chez des termites (Darrouzet et al, 2014; Leniaud et al, 2011). Un analogue chimique de JH induit chez les ouvriers (Reticulitermes flavipes) un changement de caste avec des modifications de la signature chimique. Les ouvriers termites sont un modèle de choix en raison de leur caractère larvaire et leur possibilité à changer de caste(soldat ou reproducteur). Par des approches moléculaires, nous analyserons le mode d’action de la JH sur la voie de biosynthèse des CHCs chez ces termites (action génomique, activation/inhibition d’enzymes). Pour cela, nous utiliserons un analogue chimique de JH sur des ouvriers termites;une approche transcriptomique sera menée afin de déterminer si les gènes codant pour des enzymes spécifiques de la voie de biosynthèse des CHCs (élongases, désaturases) sont exprimés différemment suite à l’induction hormonale.Cette étude sera menée en parallèle sur un second modèle d’insecte social (le frelon Vespa velutina) afin de déterminer (1) si cette régulation endocrine de la signature chimique est généralisable à diverses espèces d’insectes sociaux, et (2) si celle-ci intervient également chez des insectes au stade adulte.Cette étude apportera une meilleure connaissance des mécanismes de régulation endocrine sur la signature chimique des insectes sociaux.-Dynamique de la signature chimique des individus. Les colonies de frelons sont des colonies annuelles regroupant relativement peu d’individus (quelques centaines à milliers d’insectes)(Darrouzet, 2019). Les ouvrières, à la différence des ouvriers termites, sont des adultes qui vivent environ 1 mois. En raison de leur taille, il est aisé d’analyser les signatures chimiques au niveau individuel. Elles représentent ainsi un excellent modèle d’étude pour analyser la dynamique de cette signature,en lien par exemple avec leur âge, leur activité (construction du nid, prédation, etc.) et de la période de l’année («âge» de la colonie). Par des techniques classiques de GC-FID et GC-MS, nous étudierons le profil chimique en CHCs des ouvrières frelon selon ces divers paramètres (âge, fonction). Cette étude permettra de mieux comprendre l’activité différentielle des ouvrières, de leurs interactions sociales et des phénomènes de reconnaissance entre chacune. Ensuite, par modification de leur taux de JH (injection de JH ou d’un analogue chimique), nous pourrons induire des modifications de leur signature chimique et analyser les conséquences comportementales chez ces dernières, mais aussi de leurs congénères au sein des colonies. Cette étude, combinant des approches en écologie chimique et écologie comportementale,permettra de mieux comprendre la dynamique de cette signature chimique, des relations signature chimique -taches des ouvrières,en fonction de paramètres liés à la biologie des Vespidés.

Profil et compétences recherchées:

Niveau master (ou équivalent) en biologie avec des compétences en écologie chimique et/ou biologie moléculaire et biochimie. Le sujet de thèse étant pluridisciplinaire, des compétences ou une affinité dans les champs de compétences sera un plus. Le(la) candidat(e) devra être motivé(e) pour se former dans les domaines de compétences complémentaires à sa formation initiale. Fort intérêt pour le travail à la paillasse, aptitudes pour l’analyse des données et la rédaction scientifique, curiosité, rigueur et autonomie, bonne capacité à collaborer et à communiquer au sein d’une équipe de recherche.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PhD position: IPHC-CNRS (Strasbourg) and the Institut Cochin – INSB (Paris)

PhD position open at the IPHC-CNRS (Strasbourg) and the Institut Cochin – INSB (Paris)

Deadline: 30 June 2020 for applications. A short list of 5 applicants will be established shortly and interviews realized in the first 15 days of July.

SAME MITOCHONDRIA, DIFFERENT LONGEVITIES: WHAT DO ANTS TELL US ABOUT METABOLIC AGEING? A PROJECT COUPLING EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY TO CELLULAR BIOENERGETICS
Key-words : Ageing ; Evolution ; Mitochondria ; Bioenergetics ; Ants ; Proteomics ; Molecular biology

Ants offer an exciting scientific opportunity for the study of ageing processes since these animals have evolved a striking variability of longevities both among species but also within a species among different castes. Shorter lifespan should be associated with a faster progression of age-linked profiles of physiological traits.
In accordance, ants have been used in previous studies to evaluate how the accumulation of damages with age, antioxidant capacities or telomere dynamics may explain ants’ longevity, producing mixed support for the Reactive Oxygen Species or Disposable Soma theories. For example, queens do not show longer telomeres (a determinant of cell lifespan and individual survival) than short-lived workers (females), but do so with short-lived males, suggesting that beyond telomere length, additional cell signalling pathways may be of key importance in queen longevity determination. Energy metabolism and metabolic rate are also considered as essential components of the ageing equation with impact on longevity, shortly stated as “live fast die young”. Mitochondrion is by far the main energy provider for animal cells and also controls redox homeostasis including reactive oxygen generation/disposal.
The question is therefore if/how the longer longevity of certain castes/individuals is associated with biochemical/molecular differences that could be considered as causatives: mitochondrial efficiency, antioxidant levels or telomere dynamics. Are they modified when a worker role changes, switching her ageing phenotype from a low to a fast rate? This raises the question of influence of social context on individual senescence? One requisite is to access to ant’s bioenergetics both at the level of individuals and of mitochondria. Methodological issues will need to be addressed, our first experiments showed that respiration of ants is detected in the high resolution respirometer (O2k Oroboros instruments). In contrast, classical extraction protocols used on vertebrate organs/cells did not yield preparation in which the biochemical activity ant’s mitochondria could be measured. New protocols will have to be invented. We know how to deal with limiting amount of starting material: the extremely sensitive luciferase reaction (luminescence) is used to monitor ATP production rate and flow cytometry to evaluate membrane potential or ROS generation at the level of single mitochondria. To complete the picture of mitochondrial-derived associated ageing signalling pathways (e.g. Bax/Bak, CytC, caspases…) proteomic experiments will be settled.
In this context, we want to develop a new research project in the emerging field of socio-bioenergetics, which unifies the co-evolution of social organization with ageing processes using bioenergetics and molecular methodologies.

The present PhD project addresses the evolutionary mystery of the “ant same mitochondria but astonishing different longevities within a species”, by merging two teams with complementary skills and knowledge. The Ecology, Physiology and Ethology department of the Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien will bring its knowledge in evolutionary trade-offs bases and mechanisms of ageing and its presently running ants’ captive colonies. The Physiology and Evolutionary Physiology team (http://www.iphc.cnrs.fr/-Ethologie-et-Physiologie-Evolutive-EPE-.html) focuses on how animals cope with trade-offs (physiology and behavioural mechanisms) and what are the fitness consequences (Evolution). This will be completed by the state-to-the-art bioenergetics approaches of the team Mitochondria, Bioenergetic, Metabolism and Signalization of the Institut Cochin (https://www.institutcochin.fr/la-recherche/emd/equipe-bouillaud).
Expected skills: The PhD candidate will be shared by the IPHC and the Cochin Institute, with a consequent work using mitochondrial bioenergetics protocols which needs a substantial background in laboratory work. Thus, we are seeking for a student with a large background in energetics/molecular biology, who will be trained with evolutionary biology questioning and interpretation of the results. He will be based during the first year at the Cochin Institute (Paris), working under the supervision of
Dr F Bouillaud, doing mainly methodological set-up devoted to measurement of ants’ mitochondria bioenergetics. The second and third years are planned to be in Strasbourg, but schedule may change in relation to the project advancement.

Acquired expertise: The PhD candidate will become an expert in:
– Bioenergetics applied to insects
– Evolutionary biology of ants
– Evolutionary biology theories of ageing
– Mixed models’ statistics
– Methodological skills: mitochondrial respiration methodology, qPCR, introduction in proteomics, statistics, scientific writing, project management, communication skills.

Salary: The project is funded by a CNRS- Interdisciplinary Mission grant of 17 keuros for functioning and a PhD allowance of ca. 1700 euros (before taxes) per month for three years (2020-2023), starting next October. The PhD contract will provide access to the French social security. Possibilities of teaching at the University of Strasbourg are open, with substantial income gain. The PhD will be hosted by the doctoral school of the University of Strasbourg (ED 414), and then will have to fulfil all the training obligatory for each PhD (54h in total), mostly provided by the University (French lessons, animal care training, animal ethics…). The IPHC and Cochin research teams are friendly and international and non-French speaking applicants are welcome.

Contacts: François Criscuolo, IPHC-CNRS, francois.criscuolo@iphc.cnrs.fr, http://www.iphc.cnrs.fr/-Ethologie-et-Physiologie-Evolutive-EPE-.html
Frédéric Bouillaud, Institut Cochin INSB-CNRS, frederic.bouillaud@inserm.fr, https://www.institutcochin.fr/la-recherche/emd/equipe-bouillaud
Fabrice Bertile, IPHC-CNRS, fbertile@unistra.fr, http://www.iphc.cnrs.fr/-Spectrometrie-de-Masse-BioOrganique-LSMBO-.html

Offre de thèse : évolution de la socialité chez des insectes – MNHN de Paris

Offre de thèse :
Socialité et convergence évolutive : apport des données écomorphologiques et transcriptomiques chez les blattes

Equipe d’accueil :
La thèse se déroulera sous la direction de Frédéric Legendre et Philippe Grandcolas au sein de l’Institut de Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité (UMR ISYEB – http://isyeb.mnhn.fr/fr) au Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle de Paris.

Contacts : frederic.legendre@mnhn.fr et philippe.grandcolas@mnhn.fr
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Frederic_Legendre
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Philippe_Grandcolas

Candidature et calendrier :
Date limite de candidature : 5 avril 2020 ; date de début du doctorat flexible, entre mai et octobre 2020. Merci d’envoyer votre dossier aux deux responsables : CV détaillé, lettre de motivation, relevés de notes du parcours universitaire (dont M2 si possible), coordonnées des responsables des stages précédents (M2, M1 à minima). Avant l’envoi de votre candidature, vous pouvez contacter les responsables pour discuter du projet.

Description du sujet :
En dépit de progrès réalisés notamment grâce à la sélection de parentèle, comprendre les circonstances de l’émergence de systèmes sociaux intégrés reste un défi de taille. Chez les organismes diploïdes, et contrairement aux organismes à reproduction haplodiploïde, la sélection de parentèle n’est pas le premier déterminant évolutif. Des facteurs écologiques ou morphologiques ont pu jouer un rôle majeur dans l’origine de la socialité, mais leur importance relative reste suggérée plutôt que quantifiée, sans aucun test formel phylogénétique. Ce projet vise à étudier, dans un cadre comparatif, l’influence de facteurs écomorphologiques sur l’évolution de l’eusocialité chez les Blattodea (blattes et termites), groupe d’insectes diploïdes présentant plusieurs lignées convergentes subsociales et une seule lignée eusociale. Ces tests seront conduits en s’appuyant sur l’hypothèse de shift and dependent care, qui souligne l’importance de comportements subsociaux et d’un régime alimentaire associé au bois (i.e. xylophagie). En parallèle, des analyses transcriptomiques seront réalisées sur quatre espèces cibles, afin d’évaluer l’expression différentielle des gènes entre espèces xylophages ou non, et sociales ou non. Ces données transcriptomiques serviront en outre pour assembler les données génomiques acquises par ailleurs (hors projet de thèse) dans le cadre du projet ANR PRCI SOCIOGENOMICS (PIs : F. Legendre et E. Bornberg-Bauer ; 2020-2024). Le/la doctorant(e) sera ainsi amené(e) à travailler en collaboration avec notre partenaire, spécialisé en génomique comparative des insectes.

Méthodes envisagées :
L’écomorphologie des espèces et leurs comportements sociaux seront définis en s’appuyant sur la littérature et sur les collections d’histoire naturelle. Plusieurs traits morphologiques seront caractérisés : forme générale, forme et ornementations du pronotum, ornementations des pattes, forme des mandibules, taille des yeux, présence et longueur des ailes. Les comportements parentaux seront recensés parmi une liste pré-établie de 11 comportements. Du fait du large cadre comparatif, un focus initial sera réalisé sur 4 lignées essentielles (et leurs lignées soeurs) puis progressivement étendu à d’autres lignées, en commençant par celles présentent dans notre phylogénie de 2015
qui servira de support aux analyses comparatives phylogénétiques. Pour ces dernières, des méthodes de pointe seront utilisées (e.g. phylogenetic path analysis, morphospace, modélisation d’états ancestraux).

Profil recherché :
Diplôme de Master en lien avec le projet de thèse (évolution, systématique, biodiversité). Maîtrise avérée en analyses phylogénétiques et en méthodes comparatives (dont packages R). Capacité à travailler au sein d’une collaboration internationale. Connaissances en anatomie comparée (des insectes). Des connaissances en analyse transcriptomique ou évolution de la socialité seraient un plus, tout comme une fibre naturaliste.

Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle
Département Origines et Evolution
Institut de Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité (UMR ISYEB 7205)
Bâtiment d’Entomologie, 45 rue Buffon 75005 Paris, France
Email : frederic.legendre@mnhn.fr
Tel : +33 1 40 79 81 26
FRÉDÉRIC LEGENDRE

Poste de Maître de Conférences en Ethologie au LEEC – Université Sorbonne Paris Nord

version anglaise :

Associate Professor – Ethology

The Laboratory of Experimental and Comparative Ethology (LEEC) – UR 4443, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord (previously named Université Paris 13), is inviting applications for the position of an Associate Professor in Ethology, with tenure status and salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Applicants should have a strong track record of international excellence in behavioural sciences or related topics. The successful candidate will be expected to develop an innovative research program in ethology corresponding to the lines of research of the LEEC on aspects of social behaviour, communication and cognition, individual differences in behaviour, or on reproductive strategies.

 

The position includes teaching in ethology and in neuroscience in different modules of Bachelor in Psychology and of Master in Ethology. The candidate must be able to teach in French.

Application is electronic via the national portal Galaxie (https://www.galaxie.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/ensup/cand_postes_GALAXIE.htm)deadline for application 26 March 2020, 16:00 h. The position is advertised as a position at UNIVERSITE PARIS 13, ref. 4345.

Interested candidates can contact us for further information on the position and on the electronic application procedure.

 

Contact:

Prof. Heiko G. Rödel; Director of the LEEC

Dr. Christophe Féron, Vice-director of the LEEC

christophe.feron@univ-paris13.fr

 

Dr. David Sillam-Dussès; Director of the Teaching Department of Psychophysiology

sillamdusses@univ-paris13.fr

 

Laboratoire d’Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée (LEEC) UR 4443, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, 99 avenue J.B. Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse, France.
Phone: + 33 (0)14940 3877

http://leec.univ-paris13.fr/

 

The University of Paris 13 is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

http://www.univ-paris13.fr/

##—-

version française :

Maître de Conférences – Ethologie

Le Laboratoire d’Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée (LEEC) – UR 4443, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord (ex université Paris 13), invite les personnes intéressées et possédant les qualifications et l’expérience requises, à candidater sur un poste de Maître de conférences en éthologie.

Le LEEC recherche un candidat ayant un dossier scientifique d’un excellent niveau en biologie du comportement ou dans une discipline voisine. La personne recrutée devra développer un programme de recherche innovant en éthologie s’intégrant dans les thématiques majeures de recherches développées au LEEC telles que le comportement social, la communication et la cognition, les différences comportementales interindividuelles et/ou les stratégies reproductives.

 

Le poste à pourvoir comporte un service d’enseignement destiné aux étudiants de licence de psychologie (enseignements de psychophysiologie) et aux étudiants de nos masters d’éthologie. Le candidat ou la candidate sera amené à enseigner en français et peut-être occasionnellement en anglais.

 

Le dépôt des candidatures se fait électroniquement via le portail national Galaxie (https://www.galaxie.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/ensup/cand_postes_GALAXIE.htm). La date limite de dépôt des candidatures est fixée au 26 mars 2020 à 16h00. Le poste est référencé sur le portail Galaxie avec le numéro 4345, Université Paris 13.

 

Les candidats peuvent nous contacter pour obtenir de plus amples informations sur le poste à pourvoir et sur la procédure de recrutement.

 

Contact :

Prof. Heiko G. Rödel; directeur du LEEC

Dr. Christophe Féron, directeur adjoint du LEEC

christophe.feron@univ-paris13.fr

 

Dr. David Sillam-Dussès; responsable du Département du Psychophysiologie

sillamdusses@univ-paris13.fr

 

Laboratoire d’Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée (LEEC) UR 4443, Université Sorbonne Paris Nord, 99 avenue J.B. Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse, France.
Tél. : + 33 (0)14940 3877

http://leec.univ-paris13.fr/

———————————————————————–
Prof. Heiko G. Rödel
Directeur
Laboratoire d’Ethologie Expérimentale et Comparée-EA 4443 (LEEC)
Université Sorbonne Paris Nord
99 av. J.-B. Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse, France
Phone +33(0)14940 3218
Website LEEC   |   Publication list   |   Twitter
———————————————————————–

Offre de stage : sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus

 

We are seeking field assistants to help with research social behaviour in the ground nesting sweat bee, Halictus rubicundus for periods of between 2 and 5 months. This could be early April to early June, or late June to late August, or both combined. Start and end dates can be negotiated to some extent within these constraints, but the successful candidate/s must be available for the entire period agreed.

The assistant will be working alongside a Postdoctoral researcher at the Knepp rewilding estate in Sussex, UK. H. rubicundus is a medium sized bee that nests in small colonies (fewer than 10 individuals) in the ground and has an insignificant sting.

Work will involve:

observing foraging behaviour, handling and marking bees, setting up video cameras, uploading video footage and excavating nests from the ground. In warm weather, field assistants will work long days in the field; in bad weather there will be tasks to carry out back at the accommodation/opportunity for time off. Because the work involves recording colour marks on individual animals, the job would not be suitable for someone who is colour-blind. See our research group website for more information about the kind of work we do (https://biosciences.exeter.ac.uk/staff/index.php?web_id=Jeremy_Field).

 

Experience of working with insects and a Degree (or working towards a Degree) in a Behaviour/Evolution/Ecology-related topic are desired. The successful applicants must have enthusiasm for fieldwork and be prepared to work hard. They will obtain excellent experience of cutting-edge social insect research.

Shared accommodation near Knepp is provided, but assistants are required to pay for their own food/personal expenses. Assistants receive £125 per week to cover costs. At the time of applying, candidates must be able to demonstrate that they have the right to work in the UK.

 

Please contact Dr Rebecca Boulton (r.boulton@exeter.ac.uk) and CC Prof. Jeremy Field (j.p.Field@exeter.ac.uk) to discuss these positions further.

 

Dr Rebecca Boulton

 

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

College of Life and Environmental Sciences University of Exeter Cornwall Campus

TR10 9FE

Email: r.boulton@exeter.ac.uk

Website: https://drbeckyb.wordpress.com/

Ouverture du congrès Européen 2020 – rescheduled for next year

The European Congress of the IUSSI 2020, which was scheduled to be held at the University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France in August this year has now been rescheduled for next year (presumably at the same location):

 

Dear colleagues and friends,

 

Given the progression of the coronavirus epidemics (COVID-19), the intensification of confinement measures in many parts of the world, and the lack of visibility about the end of the crisis, it now seems very difficult to maintain the organisation of the EU-IUSSI congress in Toulouse this August. Even after the end of specific confinement actions, probably at different times in different countries, it is likely that travels and human interactions will remain regulated for several months making it difficult to hold any meeting.

 

After discussing with delegates of all European sections and the International Union, we decided to postpone the congress to 22-25 of August 2021, hoping for better times. Plenary speakers, symposium organizers, and invited symposium speakers will be asked to contribute again, as in the initial plan.

 

Although many of you already submitted abstracts on the congress web site, normally no payment could have been done at this date. If you think you did so, please contact us (marie-angele.albouy@univ-tlse3.fr).

 

We are sure you will understand this difficult but important decision

Please take care,

The organizing committee

 

Mathieu Lihoreau,

Raphael Jeanson,

Vincent Fourcassié,

Marie-Ange Albouy,

Aurore Avargues-Weber,

Jean-Marc Devaud,

Audrey Dussutour,

Martin Giurfa,

Tamara Gomez-Moracho,

Christian Jost,

Stéphane Kraus,

Jean-Paul Lachaud,

Gérard Latil,

Coline Monchanin,

Pierre Moretto,

Guy Theraulaz,

Séverine Trannoy,

Antoine Wystrach

 

 

 

 

Le Congrès Européen de l’Union International pour l’Etude des Insectes Sociaux aura lieu cette année a Toulouse, du 23 au 26 aout. La soumission des résumés et l’enregistrement sont désormais ouverts (deadline 3 mai). Vous trouverez toutes les informations importantes sur le site web du congres: https://eu-iussi2020.sciencesconf.org.

On vous attends tous a Toulouse!
Mathieu Lihoreau,
pour le comité d’organisation

Offre de stage M2 : Espèces florales invasives et pollinisateurs, sensorialité et apprentissage – Toulouse

PROPOSITION DE STAGE DE M2

 

Sujet: Espèces florales invasives et pollinisateurs : sensorialité et apprentissage

 

RENSEIGNEMENTS SUR L’EQUIPE D’ACCUEIL

Intitulé: Experience Dependent Plasticity in Insects (EXPLAIN)

Responsable(s) : Martin Giurfa & JM Devaud

Laboratoire :
Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale (CRCA)
UMR 5169 CNRS/Université Paul Sabatier

Site web : http://cognition.ups-tlse.fr/

 

RESPONSABLES DU STAGE:

Martin Giurfa

martin.giurfa@univ-tlse3.fr

0561556733

 

Sylvie Guillerme (Laboratoire GEODE, coordinatrice du projet EI2P)

sylvie.guillerme@univ-tlse2.fr

0603947504

 

CONTEXTE DU STAGE

Ce stage intervient dans le cadre du projet EI2P « Espèces invasives et pollinisateurs, entre contraintes et potentiels », financé par la Région Occitanie. Les invasions biologiques et le déclin des populations d’abeilles sont deux phénomènes qui représentent des défis majeurs car ils ont un impact négatif sur les activités économiques et agricoles et contribuent à la vulnérabilité des populations humaines. Au-delà du discours prônant une éradication irréaliste et sans nuances, ce projet explore la complexité des questions liées à la perception, à la dynamique spatiale, à la gestion et à l’utilisation potentielle des espèces exotiques envahissantes dans un contexte d’acteurs multiples aux intérêts divergents, grâce à une approche interdisciplinaire associant sciences humaines, sciences spatiales et sciences naturelles. Ce projet vise à contribuer à une meilleure compréhension des impacts des espèces envahissantes sur les systèmes de production, de leurs conséquences possibles sur les services écosystémiques, de leurs potentiels – notamment pour l’apiculture – et de leur prise en compte dans les représentations des acteurs par une approche holistique. Ce stage s’inscrit dans le volet « éthologie » du projet, qui s’attache en particulier à mettre en évidence la façon dont les abeilles perçoivent certaines espèces exotiques envahissantes dans les Pyrénées.

 

RENSEIGNEMENTS SUR LE SUJET

Objectif :

Analyser si les espèces florales invasives présentent des traits sensoriels particuliers qui leur confèrent un avantage dans un contexte de détection et butinage par les pollinisateurs, en particulier par l’abeille domestique Apis mellifera.

 

Description :

Nous nous focaliserons sur deux espèces florales invasives paradigmatiques, Reynouatria japonica (renouée du Japon) et Impatiens glandulifera (balsamine de l’Himalaya) et sur un pollinisateur majoritaire et généraliste, l’abeille domestique Apis mellifera. La connaissance approfondie des systèmes sensoriels et du traitement de ces signaux par les circuits cérébraux de l’abeille permet de comprendre et de caractériser la saillance perceptuelle des signaux floraux pour les abeilles. Ainsi, nous serons en mesure de comprendre comment les espèces invasives sont perçues par les abeilles et si elles présentent des avantages sensoriels par rapport aux espèces locales qui les entourent.

 

Dans un premier temps, nous effectuerons sur le terrain des mesures florales afin de déterminer les spectres de réflection spectrale des espèces citées ci-dessus et des espèces locales adjacentes. Nous essaierons aussi d’obtenir des échantillons des fragrances florales des espèces invasives afin de déterminer par la suite si les odeurs impliquées sont particulièrement bien apprises par les abeilles. Finalement, au niveau gustatif, nous analyserons les caractéristiques du nectar présent dans les fleurs afin de le comparer à celui des fleurs locales.

 

Dans un deuxième temps, nous réaliserons des expériences d’apprentissage dans le laboratoire afin de déterminer si les abeilles préfèrent et/ou apprennent de façon avantageuse les informations sensorielles (en particulier les odeurs) des espèces invasives.

 

A la fin, nous serons donc en mesure de 1) caractériser la sensorialité de deux espèces invasives paradigmatiques sur différents domaines perceptuels des abeilles, et 2) déterminer leur efficacité dans des expériences d’apprentissage et mémorisation, capacités qui sont à la base des activités de butinage de ces insectes.

 

 

Profil requis :

Bac +5, compétences en environnement et/ou éthologie.

 

Qualités : motivation et rigueur, sachant travailler en équipe, aimant les contacts et l’interdisciplinarité, bonnes capacités rédactionnelles et organisationnelles.

 

Date du stage : Ce stage, d’une durée de 5 mois, sera réalisé entre mai et septembre 2020 (dates ajustables).

 

Indemnités : le/la stagiaire sera indemnisé(e) sur la base de la législation en vigueur + prise en charge des frais de déplacement

 

Lieu : Toulouse, et terrain dans les Pyrénées

 

Référence bibliographique éventuelle :

Giurfa, M. 2007 Behavioral and neural analysis of associative learning in the honeybee: a taste from the magic well. J Comp Physiol A 193, 801-824. (doi:10.1007/s00359-007-0235-9).

 

Merci d’adresser votre candidature (CV et lettre de motivation) à Martin Giurfa martin.giurfa@univ-tlse3.fr) et Sylvie Guillerme (sylvie.guillerme@univ-tlse2.fr)  AU PLUS TARD LE 28 février 2020.

 

 

 

Prof. Dr. Martin Giurfa
Exceptional-Class Professor
Research Center on Animal Cognition
Center of Integrative Biology
CNRS – University Paul Sabatier – Toulouse III
118 Route de Narbonne
31062 Toulouse cedex 9
FRANCE

Phone (direct): 33 (0) 561 55 67 33
Fax: 33 (0) 561 55 61 54
Mail: martin.giurfa@univ-tlse3.fr

http://cbi-toulouse.fr/eng/equipe-giurfa-devaud

Offre de Post-doc : Evolutionary genomics, social supergene evolution – University of Lausanne, Switzerland

Postdoctoral position in evolutionary genomics, social supergene evolution, University of Lausanne
 
A Postdoctoral position in evolutionary genomics is available in the group of Prof. Michel Chapuisat at the Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The group studies social evolution. We are currently investigating the evolution and maintenance of a supergene controlling social organization in ants. Our approach combines genomics, genetics, behavioral experiments and ecological surveys in the field. For more information, see http://www.unil.ch/dee/page7000.html.
 
Your responsibilities:
You will study the genomic evolution of a supergene controlling social organization in Formica ants. You will contribute to analyze an existing data set, which includes chromosome-level genome assembly, re-sequencing data and RNA-seq data. The project will then be extended towards populations genomics, transcriptomics or comparative genomics, depending on your interests and background. There will also be scope to accommodate personal ideas or projects. 
 
Your qualifications:
We are seeking to recruit an early carrier post-doctoral researcher with a PhD degree in evolutionary biology, genomics, bioinformatics or related fields. The ideal candidate should have skills and experience in one or more of the following fields: comparative genomics, population genomics, molecular evolution, transcriptomics. The candidate should have a convincing publication track-record, excellent inter-personal skills and a strong ability to work in a team.
 
What the position offers you:
We offer a nice working place in a multicultural, diverse and dynamic academic environment, with
opportunities for professional training. The Department of Ecology and Evolution in Lausanne University hosts research groups working on a broad range of topics, producing a rich intellectual and social life. Although French is the common language in Lausanne region, the department research activities and seminars are conducted in English. The University of Lausanne offers state-of-the-art facilities, including excellent computer facilities and molecular labs.
 
Contact for further information:
Prof. Michel Chapuisat: Michel.Chapuisat@unil.ch
 
Your application:
Deadline: 24.02.2020.
Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the position is filled.
To apply, please upload a single pdf document containing: a cover letter with a short description of your research interests, research experience, and why you are interested in joining our group; Your CV; The contact details of 2-3 referees; A copy of your PhD degree. Ideally, you should have received your PhD within the last 3 years or be about to obtain it in the next six months.
 
To receive full consideration, application documents should be uploaded online through the University of Lausanne recruitment platform.
Please apply through this webpage: https://bit.ly/2Sid1Go

Offre de thèse : Evolutionary biology – University of Lausanne, Switzerland

A Ph.D. position in evolutionary biology is available in the group of Prof. Michel Chapuisat at the Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Lausanne, Switzerland. The group studies social evolution. We are currently investigating the evolution and maintenance of a supergene controlling social organization in ants. Our approach combines genomics, genetics, behavioral experiments and ecological surveys in the field. For more information, see http://www.unil.ch/dee/page7000.html.
 
Animal societies vary greatly in social organization, yet the genomic, behavioral and ecological processes causing this diversity are poorly understood. The Alpine silver ant Formica selysi provides an ideal system to study the evolution of alternative social organization, because a supergene – a large group of linked genes – determines whether the colony has one or multiple queens. The successful candidate will perform experiments to better understand the genomic, behavioral and/or ecological factors contributing to the maintenance of this social polymorphism.
 
Your qualifications:
In order to complete our team, we are looking for someone with a Master’s degree in biology, life sciences, genetics, bioinformatics, or related subjects. Applicants should have knowledge and skills pertaining to evolutionary biology, genetics, genomics, behavior or ecology. We are looking for a creative, curious and motivated person with excellent communication and interpersonal skills.
 
What the position offers you:
We offer a nice working place in a multicultural, diverse and dynamic academic environment, with opportunities for professional training. The Department of Ecology and Evolution in Lausanne University hosts research groups working on a broad range of topics, producing a rich intellectual and social life. Although French is the common language in Lausanne region, the department research activities and seminars are conducted in English. The University of Lausanne offers state-of-the-art facilities, including excellent computer facilities and molecular labs.
 
Contact for further information:
Prof. Michel Chapuisat : Michel.Chapuisat@unil.ch
 
Your application:
Deadline: 24.02.2020.
Incoming applications will continue to be considered until the position is filled.
To apply, please upload a single pdf document containing: a cover letter with a short description of your research interests, research experience, and why you are interested in joining our group; Your CV; The contact details of 2-3 referees; A copy of your Master degree; Your Master’s thesis summary.
 
To receive full consideration, application documents should be uploaded online through the University of Lausanne recruitment platform. 
Please apply through this webpage: https://bit.ly/31vIvgh

Offre de thèse : Transmission dynamics and disease defences in ants – University of Bristol

1 fully-funded PhD position to study transmission dynamics and disease defences in ants at the University of Bristol, UK

As part of an ERC-funded project (ERC Starting Grant), we are looking for a PhD student to investigate how ant colonies adjust different components of their disease defences (transmission-inhibiting social organisation, collective sanitary actions and personal immunity) in environment with high pathogen pressure. The project will involve a combination of controlled pathogen inoculations, behavioural experiments (automated tracking of individually marked ants), molecular work (physiological assays and immune gene expression analysis), and computational analyses of tracking data (social network analyses and simulations). The project will aim to elucidate whether ants use changes in spatial and social organisation as an active strategy to decrease epidemic risk.

Detailed information can be found in the attached PDF or at https://stroeymeyt-lab.ch/open-positions

If you are interested in joining the team, please send your application by email to nathalie.stroeymeyt@bristol.ac.uk

Your application should consist of a single merged pdf file including:
(i) a full CV and publication list;
(ii) a 1-2 page research statement describing your past research experience, current research interests, and why you are a suitable candidate for this project;
(iii) a short proposal (0.5-1 page) on how you would address the project’s goal;
(iv) the names and contact details of at least two referees;
(v) copies of (or links to) your publications and/or your Master’s thesis (if available).

Evaluation of candidates will begin on February 15th, 2020 and continue until the position is filled.

All enquiries may be sent to nathalie.stroeymeyt@bristol.ac.uk

Offre de thèse : Analyse des interactions dans les systèmes multi trophiques – Université Libre de Bruxelles

Offre de bourse de thèse (première année)

Titre : Analyse des interactions dans les systèmes multi trophiques : le cas des interactions entre la bactérie Serratia symbiotica, les pucerons hôtes et les fourmis.

Encadrants: Claire Detrain, service d’écologie sociale, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgique, cdetrain@ulb.ac.be. Site web : http://use.ulb.be

En collaboration avec Thierry Hance, Laboratoire d’écologie des interactions et contrôle biologique, Earth and Life Institute, UCL, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgique Thierry.hance@uclouvain.be
Lieu et Période d’engagement :
Une année de bourse de thèse (12 mois) est disponible immédiatement mais sans garantie au-delà d’une année. La ou le candidat(e) sélectionnée s’engage à s’inscrire immédiatement en thèse à l’Université Libre de Bruxelles et à postuler ensuite pour l’obtention d’une bourse de prolongation de 3 ans auprès du FRS-FNRS.
Ce travail de recherche multidisciplinaire sera réalisé à titre principal au sein du service d’écologie sociale avec des séjours réguliers dans le laboratoire d’écologie des interactions.

Montant mensuel brut de la bourse : 2899 euros

Projet :
Certaines bactéries symbiotiques de pucerons peuvent modifier le phénotype de leurs hôtes en affectant leur fitness négativement mais aussi en leur apportant des propriétés nouvelles en cas de stress de l’environnement. Dans contexte, la bactérie Serratia symbiotica montre des degrés divers de relation symbiotique avec les pucerons. Certaines souches sont des symbiotes devenus obligatoires et intracellulaires, d’autres souches sont des symbiotes facultatifs avec différents tropismes cellulaires alors que d’autres enfin, se développent librement dans le tube digestif de leur hôte. Ces dernières souches sont particulièrement intéressantes dans la mesure où la colonisation de l’intestin des pucerons par les bactéries induit un coût de fitness pour l’hôte mais lui confère également une protection contre les parasitoïdes. Fait intéressant, les fourmis qui prennent soin des pucerons porteurs de la souche libre de S. symbiotica montrent également la présence de bactéries dans la première partie de leur intestin. Dans ce cas, plusieurs questions restent cependant inexplorées. Quels avantages ou coûts, les bactéries apportent-elles aux fourmis ? Comment les bactéries influencent-elles le système multitrophique des pucerons et des parasitoïdes ? Les fourmis contribuent-elles à disséminer les bactéries parmi les populations de pucerons ?
Pour répondre à ces questions, ce projet de thèse est divisé en trois tâches : 1) une étude de la cinétique de la colonisation du tube digestif des fourmis par les bactéries, notamment par les techniques de FISH, 2) une analyse de l’impact de la bactérie sur le comportement des fourmis et sur leur activité de soins aux pucerons, 3) une étude de la possibilité de transmission horizontale de la bactérie vers les fourmis via le miellat des pucerons et entre fourmis via la trophallaxie.

Diplôme et compétences requis
– Le candidat (H/F) sera détenteur du titre de master en biologie, bioingénieur, ou formation équivalente
– Expérience dans l’analyse et le traitement statistique de données, dans l’utilisation des logiciels R ou Matlab.
– Bonne connaissance de l’anglais écrit et oral
– Goût pour la mise en place d’élevage et l’élaboration de dispositifs expérimentaux.
– Des connaissances en microbiologie constituent un avantage.

Candidature
Par voie électronique avant le 15 FEVRIER 2020, soumettre un CV et une lettre de motivation à Claire Detrain (cdetrain@ulb.ac.be). Une copie de la candidature sera envoyée simultanément à Thierry Hance Thierry.hance@uclouvain.be

 

 

Offre de thèse : collective behaviour and social immunity at the University of Bristol (UK

A fully-funded PhD position is available in the Ant Lab headed by Dr Nathalie Stroeymeyt at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, UK, to investigate the strategies used by ants to decrease epidemic risk in environments with high pathogen pressure.

 

Background

Group living offers favourable conditions for the spread of infectious diseases, because high population densities and frequent social contacts facilitate pathogen transmission. To mitigate that risk, social animals have evolved a variety of defence mechanisms to prevent the entry and propagation of pathogens within the group, ranging from raised investment in personal immunity to highly coordinated collective sanitary actions conferring social immunity. Recent studies have shown that social groups can also adopt organisational features, such as the subdivision into well-separated subgroups, which reduce epidemic risk through transmission bottleneck effects. However, the importance of such organisational immunity features in disease risk management by real animal groups is still poorly understood. Research in our group adopts an empirical approach based on the experimental manipulations of garden ant colonies (Lasius niger) to (i) quantify the effect of social organisation on disease transmission and test key predictions from network epidemiology, and (ii) evaluate the relative of importance of personal immunity, collective sanitary actions and organisational features under different environmental conditions and at different stages of development (for more detail see https://stroeymeyt-lab.ch/research).

 

The project

The goal of this PhD project will be to understand how ant colonies adjust different components of their disease defences (personal immunity, collective sanitary actions and transmission-inhibiting social organisation) in response to repeated disease challenges. The project will involve a combination of controlled pathogen inoculations, behavioural experiments (automated tracking of individually marked ants), molecular work (physiological assays and immune gene expression analysis), and computational analyses of tracking data (social network analyses and simulations). The project will aim to elucidate whether ants use changes in spatial and social organisation as an active strategy to decrease epidemic risk.

 

Desired profile

We are looking for candidates with experience in quantitative behavioural analysis and programming and/or molecular biology techniques, and a willingness to apply a variety of approaches (behavioural tracking, writing own code to analyse the data, and lab work). A good working knowledge in statistics and experimental design is also desirable. Experience with social insects and insect immunity would be a plus. Candidates must be creative, motivated and passionate about science, have excellent oral and written communication skills, and be at ease working both independently and as part of a team.

 

The position

The position will be part of an overall project team consisting of two PhD students and two post-doctoral researchers and will be fully funded for 3.5 years by an ERC Starting Grant. The candidate will receive a maintenance stipend at the minimum UKRI rate and home (UK/EU) tuition fees will be covered by the grant.

 

Location

The School of Biological Sciences at the University of Bristol is a highly dynamic, international and interdisciplinary environment, spanning a wide range of research in Evolutionary Biology, Animal Behaviour and Sensory Ecology, Plant and Agricultural Sciences, and Ecology and Environmental Changes (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/biology/research/).

 

Expected starting date

May 1st 2020 (flexible)

 

How to apply

Please send your application by email to nathalie.stroeymeyt@bristol.ac.uk. Your application should consist of a single merged pdf file including:

(i)            a full CV and publication list;

(ii)           a 1-2 page research statement describing your past

research experience, current research interests, and why

you are a suitable candidate for this project;

(iii)          a short proposal (0.5-1 page) on how you would address

the project’s goal;

(iv)         the names and contact details of at least two referees;

(v)          copies of (or links to) your publications and/or your

Master’s thesis (if available).

Evaluation of candidates will begin on February 15th, 2020 and continue until the position is filled.

 

References

Stroeymeyt et al. (2014). Organisational immunity in social insects. Current Opinion in Insect Science 5, 1.

 

Stroeymeyt et al. (2018). Social network plasticity decreases disease transmission in a eusocial insect. Science 362, 941.

 

Nathalie Stroeymeyt <nathalie.stroeymeyt@bristol.ac.uk>

 

Offre de CDD : Ingénieur d’études en biologie moléculaire appliquée à l’abeille – Toulouse

Intitulé de l’offre : Ingénieur d’études en biologie moléculaire appliquée à l’abeille (H/F)
Référence : UMR5169-MARGIU1-001
Lieu de travail : TOULOUSE
Date de publication : lundi 13 janvier 2020
Type de contrat : CDD Technique/Administratif
BAP : Sciences du vivant, de la terre et de l’environnement
Emploi type : Ingénieur-e en techniques biologiques
Durée du contrat : 18 mois
Date d’embauche prévue : 1 mai 2020
Quotité de travail : Temps complet
Rémunération : 2184.44
Niveau d’études souhaité : Ingénieur
Expérience souhaitée : 1 à 4 années

 

Lien: https://emploi.cnrs.fr/Gestion/Offre/Default.aspx?Ref=UMR5169-MARGIU1-001

 

Missions

L’Ingénieur/e d’études participera activement à un projet de recherche (APITASTE) financé par l’Agence Nationale de la Recherche, destiné à étudier la neuromodulation du sens du goût chez l’abeille domestique Apis mellifera. Il/elle devra effectuer des expériences de biologie moléculaire afin d’étudier le rôle de gènes codant pour des récepteurs cibles. Il/elle devra étudier leur expression dans des régions du cerveau isolées par microdissection laser suite à des expériences comportementales auxquelles il/elle devra contribuer activement.

 

Activités

Expériences de biologie moléculaire (différentes techniques) sur des gènes codant pour des récepteurs choisis; test de leur efficacité in vitro & in vivo, microdissection laser, RT-qPCR, expériences comportementales sur les abeilles (déconseillé pour individus allergiques).

 

Compétences

Maîtrise de techniques de biologie moléculaire classiques, prédisposition aux micromanipulations (injections, dissections) et à se former aux tests comportementaux gustatifs chez l’abeille. Analyses, mise en forme et présentations de résultats.

 

Contexte de travail

Le travail de recherche s’effectuera au Centre de Recherches sur la Cognition Animale, institut CNRS spécialisé dans l’étude de la cognition (apprentissage,mémoire et perception sensorielle) chez l’animal (dir. C. RAMPON; voir http://crca.cbi-toulouse.fr/). La personne recrutée émargera à l’équipe EXPLAIN (dirs. M. GIURFA & JM DEVAUD) travaillant sur l’apprentissage et la mémoire chez les insectes, notamment sur les abeilles (voir http://cbi-toulouse.fr/fr/equipe-giurfa-devaud). Le projet de recherche s’inscrit dans le projet APITASTE finance par l’Agence Nationale de la Recherche, destine à comprendre les principes du codage et apprentissage gustatif chez l’abeille (voir https://anr.fr/Projet-ANR-18-CE37-0021).

 

Contraintes et risques

Conditions horaires établies de 7h par jour, 5 jours à la semaine. L’IE participera aussi aux réunions périodiques du consortium ANR ayant la responsabilité de ce projet ainsi qu’aux réunions régulières, congrès, séminaires, etc auxquels participe l’équipe d’accueil.

Face au risque éventuel de piqûres d’abeilles, personnes allergiques s’abstenir.

 

Prof. Dr. Martin Giurfa
Exceptional-Class Professor
Research Center on Animal Cognition
Center of Integrative Biology
CNRS – University Paul Sabatier – Toulouse III
118 Route de Narbonne
31062 Toulouse cedex 9
FRANCE

Phone (direct): 33 (0) 561 55 67 33
Fax: 33 (0) 561 55 61 54
Mail: martin.giurfa@univ-tlse3.fr

http://cbi-toulouse.fr/eng/equipe-giurfa-devaud

Offre de thèse : Thermal Adaptation in Native Australian Bees, Monash

No deadline given

Monash U Australia/Graduate Position/Immediate start

A fully-funded Ph.D. position is available examining thermal adaptation in native Australian bees. Bees are keystone species in many ecosystems due to their role as pollinators. Any changes in the abundance and distribution of bees will have significant knock-on effects on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Despite their outsized ecological role, we know very little about climatic adaptation in bees, or even which climatic factors drive bee distributions.

In this project, we will use the rich and diverse Australian bee fauna to investigate the capacity of bees to adapt to climate change. Using field-based surveys of a bees thermal tolerances, comparative phylogenetic approaches and field reciprocal transplant experiments the project aims to: determine the role of temperature and rainfall in shaping the distribution of native bee species, predict the capacity of native bees to adapt to climate change and determine the role of environment and genetic variation in shaping population variation.

We are seeking a student who is highly motivated and passionate about evolutionary biology. Preferred candidates will have experience in evolution, ecology and thermal physiology, although experience in these areas is not necessary. There will be opportunities for the successful applicant to pursue their own scientific ideas within the aims of the project. The successful candidates will be supervised by Dr Vanessa Kellermann (Monash University) and Dr Ros Gloag (University of Sydney) and will be based at Monash University’s School of Biological Sciences.

The successful applicant will be awarded a scholarship that covers salary (current rate is $27,862 AUD tax-free per year), and a waiver of student fees, international students are welcome to apply.

Interested applicants should submit a CV, a copy of their academic transcript and a cover letter outlining their research interests to vanessa.kellermann@monash.edu and ros.gloag@sydney.edu.au. For links to the PhD application process at Monash University go to vanessakellermann.com.

Offre de postdoc : Evolution and Genomics of Attine Ant Fungi, Copenhagen

Deadline: 10 January 2020

The Department of Biology in the Faculty of Science at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark is offering a Postdoctoral fellowship in fungal evolution and genomics, commencing 1 September 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter. The University of Copenhagen provides a top-notch research environment and the city of Copenhagen provides a vibrant cultural scene.

Scientific environment 
The fellowship will be part of a research project financed by an ERC Starting Grant based in the thriving research environment of the Section of Ecology and Evolution, and will involve some fieldwork in the Panamanian tropical rainforests at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (http://www.stri.si.edu/). The successful applicant will have experience and interest in evolution, genomics, bioinformatics, and fungus culturing methods.

Project Description 
The project will explore genomic signatures of crop domestication, focusing on a lineage of fungi that has been cultivated for food by attine ants for millions of years. These fungi have traits that reinforce their value as co-evolved food crops, and they depend on their ant farmers to provide them with nutritional substrates (e.g. fresh vegetation) foraged from the environment. The postdoc will take part in collection trips to Panamanian rainforests, perform integrative in vitro studies of fungus cultivar performance, and use genomics and bioinformatics tools to explore the metabolic pathways governing fungus crop performance.

Job description 
The position is available for a 2-year period and your key tasks as a Postdoctoral Fellow at SCIENCE are:

  • To manage and carry out your research project
  • To oversee student research related to your project
  • Write scientific articles
  • To travel to and perform field research in tropical rainforests
  • Disseminate your research

Formal Qualifications

  • PhD in Biology with good results (including publications and conference presentations)
  • An interest in fungal evolution, genomics and bioinformatics
  • Experience with sequencing and molecular analyses
  • Experience isolating and in vitro culturing of fungus
  • Creativity and ability to be both team-oriented and independent
  • A proven record of excellent English speaking, reading and writing skills.
  • Embrace of an international research environment and interdisciplinary research

Terms of employment  
The position is covered by the Memorandum on Job Structure for Academic Staff.

Terms of appointment and payment accord to the agreement between the Ministry of Finance and The Danish Confederation of Professional Associations on Academics in the State.

The starting salary is currently at a minimum DKK 426.625 including annual supplement (+ pension up to DKK 72.952). Negotiation for salary supplement is possible.

Application Procedure 
The application, in English, must be submitted electronically by clicking APPLY NOW below.

How to apply 
Applications must include:

  • Cover letter
  • Statement of research interests and reasons for applying to this position (max 2 pages)
  • Curriculum vitae (including a list of publications)
  • Copies of relevant diplomas and transcripts (PhD, Master and Bachelor)
  • Separate reprints of 3 particularly relevant papers
  • Full contact details (name, address, e-mail, telephone numbers and addresses of 2-3 professional referees).

In addition to the fulfilment of the above-mentioned qualifications, the main criterion for selection will be the research potential of the applicant, the match with the project and good interpersonal skills. Additionally, my research group and the University of Copenhagen strive to reflect the diversity of society and welcomes applications from all qualified candidates regardless of personal background.

The deadline for applications is 10 January 2020, 23:59 GMT +1.   

After the expiry of the deadline for applications, the authorized recruitment manager selects applicants for assessment on the advice of the Interview Committee. Afterwards, an assessment committee will be appointed to evaluate the selected applications. The applicants will be notified of the composition of the committee and the final selection of a successful candidate will be made by the Head of Department, based on the recommendations of the assessment committee and the interview committee.

The main criterion for selection will be the research potential of the applicant and the previously mentioned skills. You can read more about the recruitment process at http://employment.ku.dk/faculty/recruitment-process/

Questions 
For specific information about the Postdoctoral Fellowship please refer to the website of Assistant Professor Jonathan Shik (www.jonathanshik.com), or contact him at jonathan.shik@bio.ku.dk, Direct Phone: +45 31152140.

For further details, and to apply, see: https://employment.ku.dk/all-vacancies/?show=150980

Offre de thèse : PhD student: Social Immunity in Ants, IST Austria

Deadline: 8 January 2020

We are loooking for a highly motivated student to join our team working on the social immunity in ant colonies. The PhD thesis will be integrated in an ERC project to elucidate how ant colonies as a whole reach disease defence by the cooperative actions of its members. In particularly, we study the behavioural interaction of the individuals, their chemical communication and hygiene measures, as well as their individual immune responses.

For more details on our research activities, please see: https://socialimmunity.com

If you are interested, please send an email with your CV and motivation letter to Sylvia Cremer, IST Austria: sylvia.cremer@ist.ac.at

Please note that PhD students are accepted to the general IST Austria Graduate school and are affiliated to a research group after a training period (rotations in research groups and coursework). All applications hence need to be formally submitted to the IST Austria Graduate School with a deadline of January 8th, 2020.

For more information, please see: https://phd.pages.ist.ac.at

Offre de thèse :Bumblebees and climate change, Imperial College at Silwood Park

 

Deadline: 6 January 2020

PhD: Studying bumblebee population dynamics and adaptations to understand plant-pollinator evolution under climate change Supervisors: Richard Gill, Jacob Johansson & Keith Larson

To date our understanding of how insect pollinator declines are influenced by climate change remains limited. For instance, why have some species shown evidence of latitudinal range shifts in apparent response to climate change when others have not? To address this type of question requires us to understand the eco-evolutionary processes by which insect pollinator populations and their host plants are dynamically responding and how this translates to plant-pollinator network evolution under climate change. Taking a population biology approach (using complementary genetic approaches), this project will look to understand how bumblebee populations and host plant visitations have changed over the past 50 years for an Arctic bumblebee community in Lapland, Sweden. This will involve understanding how preceding climatic condition has affected population demography of each of 13 species of bumblebee. The study will reveal changes on population trait frequencies over space and time and how resource competition is determined through adaptations to temperature extremes to predict plant-pollinator network structure and the potential for species invasions.

The project takes advantage of a unique phenology transect established over a century ago allowing us to compare past data on bumblebee/plant community composition and phenology with contemporary data spanning the major warming over the last five decades. The transect runs along an altitudinal gradient on Mount Nuolja, Abisko, providing a thermal cline with the study taking a space-for-time substitution approach. The student will become experienced in using a number of interdisciplinary techniques, including a variety of fieldwork skills, bee and plant taxonomic identification, molecular methods in DNA barcoding and population genetics, studying bee thermal profiling, managing and analysing big data, skills in ecological network construction, statistics and developing mathematical models to understand extinction vulnerability. The project will involve a significant amount of fieldwork in the Arctic and will require the candidate to be relatively physically fit. This interdisciplinary project will also benefit from co-supervision & collaboration from a number of world-leading scientists, including: Jacob Johansson (Imperial College and Lund University, Sweden); Keith Larson (Umea University, Sweden); Jason Tylianakis (Canterbury University, NZ), Andrew MacDougal (University of Guelph, Canada); Emily Baird (Stockholm University (Sweden).

The PhD is competitively funded. The student will based at the Silwood Park campus of Imperial College and hosted by the Gill lab that is well equipped to study bee evolution and ecology. The student will be surrounded by world leading researchers in the disciplines of ecology, evolution and conservation. Facilities include 100 hectares of field site, new controlled environment rooms, microbiology facility, labs tailored for bee research and spacious workspace.

Please send your CV, a one page cover letter explaining why you are suitable for the project, and the names and e-mail addresses of two referees to Dr Richard Gill r.gill@imperial.ac.uk by 6th January
2020. Informal enquiries for either are welcomed.

Student eligibility: Applicants should have, or be about to obtain, a Masters qualification and have a 2.1 or higher undergraduate degree in Biology, Ecology, Evolution or similar. To be eligible for a full award they must have either British Citizenship, or Settled status in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay, or been « ordinarily resident » in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship – (For non-EU citizens, this must not have been in full time education.). This does not apply to UK nationals.

Dr Richard Gill
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
Silwood Park campus
Buckhurst Road, Ascot
Berkshire, SL5 7PY
UK
Phone: 44 (0)20 759 42215
Webpage: http://www.imperial.ac.uk/people/r.gill

Senior Lecturer, Grand Challenges in Ecosystems and the Environment Initiative
Course Director for Masters of Research (MRes) in Ecology, Evolution & Conservation

Soutenance d’HDR : Communication chez les insectes

HABILITATION À DIRIGER DES RECHERCHES
Discipline : Sciences de la Vie
Année universitaire : 2019/2020

Présenté et soutenu publiquement par Christophe Lucas
Le mercredi 18 décembre 2019, Salle des thèses, Bâtiment L, Parc de Grandmont à 14h

 

Communication chez les insectes : signaux, adaptation, spécialisation

Les organismes vivants ne sont pas isolés dans leurs environnements. Ils côtoient des semblables, des partenaires, des prédateurs et des compétiteurs dans un milieu où ils doivent s’orienter, s’organiser, se substanter pour survivre. Ainsi les êtres vivants interagissent tous les uns avec les autres et de ces interactions complexes émergent une force évolutive. Comprendre ces relations qui sont au centre de l’adaptation des espèces à leur environnement est une question centrale en biologie évolutive. Force majeure de l’évolution, cette adaptation dépend d’un système de communication qui permet aux individus d’obtenir des informations sur ce qui les entourent. Une relation dynamique d’échange de messages forme la nature même de la nécessité de communication, entre un émetteur et un receveur, entre une source et un récepteur. C’est sur cette base d’informations provenant de sources biotiques et abiotiques, que les individus modifient leurs comportements. Ainsi, un polymorphisme comportemental émerge, influençant par la même les autres organismes et les autres facteurs abiotiques avoisinants. L’individu lui-même émetteur de ce comportement va modifier sa physiologie, l’expression de ses gènes, voire sa morphologie. La double modification des facteurs externes et internes de l’individu définit la dynamique « environnement – gène – comportement ». Les systèmes de communication ont donc un rôle central dans les interactions écologiques (interactions individu–environnement), s’appuyant sur des signaux de communication émis dans l’environnement, ils agissent sur l’expression génique des individus et modifient leurs réponses comportementales.

Dans l’exposé qui suit, je résume mes travaux sur la communication chez les insectes à travers l’étude des signaux de communication, la formation de ces signaux, l’adaptation des espèces à leurs environnements en utilisant les différents signaux perçus et le fonctionnement du polymorphisme comportemental via des canaux de communication spécialisés. Le comportement est la résultante observable des systèmes de communication, il représente donc l’objet principal quantifiable de mes travaux, tout en y étant intimement lié. Ainsi à travers le prisme de mes travaux, nous allons découvrir comment un signal de communication est produit, centralisé puis circule entre les individus pour finir par modifier leurs comportements, leurs capacités d’adaptation face aux contraintes environnementales jusqu’à changer leurs propres devenir en modifiant l’expression de leurs gènes et leurs phénotypes.

Mots-clés : Communication, Comportement, Insectes, Expression génique, Polyéthisme, Polyphénisme, Socialité, Reproduction, Conflits, Adaptation, Ecologie chimique, Ecologie comportementale, Génétique comportementale.

 

Communication in insects: signals, adaptation, specialization

Live organisms are not isolated in their environments. They are in contact with siblings, partners, predators and competitors in a shared environment where, to survive, they must be able to orient themselves but also organize and feed themselves. Thus, they must interact with each other and from these complex interactions emerge an evolutionary force. Understanding these interactions, which are at the heart of species adaptation, is a key question in evolutionary biology. This adaptation is a driving force of species evolution, depending on a communication system which allows individuals to obtain information about their surrounding environments. Back-and-forth message sharing represents the main component of the communication between a transmitter and a receiver, between a source and a receptor. Based on information from biotic and abiotic sources, individuals modify their behaviors. Therefore, a behavioral polymorphism emerges, which involves modifications of other organisms and of the surrounding abiotic factors as well. The individual emitting this behavior, will modify its physiology, its gene expression and sometimes its morphology. The double modification of the individual’s internal and external factors defines the dynamic « environment – gene – behavior ». Communication systems thus play a central role in ecological interactions (individual-environment interactions). Based on communication signals emitted in the environment, they act on gene expression and modify the behavioral responses of individuals.

In the following discussion, I summarize my work on communication in insects through the study of communication signals, the formation of these signals, the adaptation of species to their environment using different perceived signals and the mechanisms of the behavioral polymorphism through specialized communication channels. The direct observable results from communication systems is behavior, therefore it represents the main focus of my studies. Through the prism of my own work, we will discover how a communication signal is produced, centralized and then how it circulates between individuals to eventually change their behaviors, their ability to adapt to environmental constraints and to finally end up changing their own future through the modification of their gene expression and their phenotype.

Keywords: Communication, Behavior, Insects, Gene expression, Polyethism, Polyphenism, Sociality, Reproduction, Conflicts, Adaptation, Chemical ecology, Behavioral ecology, Behavioral genetic.

Offre de Post-doc & Thèse – Several postdoc and PhD positions on bees and ants: US, UK, Germany, Denmark

POSTDOC: GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY OF ANTS, YALE
   
    https://bgc.yale.edu/opportunities
   
    A new, 2-3 year postdoc position is available in association with the Yale Center for Biodiversity and Global Change (BGC Center), the GEO BON Species Populations Working Group, Map of Life, and the Jetz Lab. The position is part of a larger, collaborative initiative to advance a conservation-relevant knowledgebase for focal taxa at a global scale, supported through the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation and associated sponsors, NASA and others. The postdoc will benefit from working closely with a growing group of Center-based biodiversity scientists, modelers, coordinators, and informaticians and from engaging with a global collaborative network of species group and methods experts worldwide. Support for project-related travel and workshops is available. Target start date for the position is spring through fall 2020.
   
    We are seeking an innovative thinker with a strong quantitative background who is interested in addressing ecological, conservation, biogeographic, or macroevolutionary questions for Ants as a global study system. Qualifications for the position include a PhD in ecology, conservation, macroevolution, bio-/geography, or biological informatics, combined with experience in spatial biodiversity analysis and inference. The preferred candidate will have a deep understanding of this species group, a passion for advancing its spatial knowledge base, a strong interest in the model-based integration of large, disparate biodiversity data, a dedication toward conscientious work in a team, attention to detail, and strong communication skills. Particularly welcome is an ability to traverse ecological, evolutionary, and conservation perspectives and to address processes at different spatial and temporal scales. We expect strong analysis and scientific writing skills. Experience in several scripting languages, database management, taxonomic name management, remote sensing, and/or biodiversity informatics are highly welcome.
   
    The position offers broad thematic flexibility, and focal research questions may be macroecological, conservation-focused, biogeographical, macroevolutionary, or comparative. We ask candidates to briefly describe their preferred thematic interest in the cover letter.
    We strongly encourage applications from women and minorities. Diversity, equity, and inclusion are core values in our group, and we believe that a diverse team will enable a broader perspective and enhance creativity.
   
    The Yale BGC Center connects biodiversity scientists from across campus and hosts a range of speaker and workshop events. It supports research and training around the use of new technologies and data flows for model-based inference and prediction of biodiversity distributions and changes at large spatial and taxonomic scales. Flagship Center projects include Map of Life and activities supporting the Half- Earth Map and the development of the GEO BON Species Population Essential Biodiversity Variables. Other initiatives associated with the Center include the integration of macroevolutionary and biogeographic inference (e.g., VertLife, ButterflyNet), NASA-supported remote sensing-informed layers and tools for biodiversity modelling (EarthEnv), the Max Planck-Yale Center on Biodiversity Movement and Global Change, and the Wildlife Insights initiative for camera trapping data.
   
    Yale University offers researchers and staff competitive salaries and a generous package of benefits. Yale has a thriving and growing community of young scholars in ecology, evolution and global change science in the EEB Department, the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies, the Peabody Museum, and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. New Haven is renowned for its classic Ivy League setting, 75 miles northeast of New York City. To apply please send, in one pdf, a short motivation (i.e. cover) letter, CV and names and contact information for three referees to anna.schuerkmann@yale.edu, subject « BGC Postdoc – Ants ». Review of applications will begin on 9 December 2019 and continue until the position is filled.
   
    ———

POSTDOC: GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY OF BEES, YALE
   
    https://bgc.yale.edu/opportunities
   
    A new, 2-3 year postdoc position is available in association with the Yale Center for Biodiversity and Global Change (BGC Center), the GEO BON Species Populations Working Group, Map of Life, and the Jetz Lab. The position is part of a larger, collaborative initiative to advance a conservation-relevant knowledgebase for focal taxa at a global scale, supported through the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation and associated sponsors, NASA and others. The postdoc will benefit from working closely with a growing group of Center-based biodiversity scientists, modelers, coordinators, and informaticians and from engaging with a global collaborative network of species group and methods experts worldwide. Support for project-related travel and workshops is available. Target start date for the position is spring through fall 2020.
   
    We are seeking an innovative thinker with a strong quantitative background who is interested in addressing ecological, conservation, biogeographic, or macroevolutionary questions for Bees as a global study system. Qualifications for the position include a PhD in ecology, conservation, macroevolution, bio-/geography, or biological informatics, combined with experience in spatial biodiversity analysis and inference. The preferred candidate will have a deep understanding of this species group, a passion for advancing its spatial knowledge base, a strong interest in the model-based integration of large, disparate biodiversity data, a dedication toward conscientious work in a team, attention to detail, and strong communication skills. Particularly welcome is an ability to traverse ecological, evolutionary, and conservation perspectives and to address processes at different spatial and temporal scales. We expect strong analysis and scientific writing skills. Experience in several s cripting languages, database management, taxonomic name management, remote sensing, and/or biodiversity informatics are highly welcome.
   
    The position offers broad thematic flexibility, and focal research questions may be macroecological, conservation-focused, biogeographical, macroevolutionary, or comparative. We ask candidates to briefly describe their preferred thematic interest in the cover letter.
   
    We strongly encourage applications from women and minorities. Diversity, equity, and inclusion are core values in our group, and we believe that a diverse team will enable a broader perspective and enhance creativity.
   
    The Yale BGC Center connects biodiversity scientists from across campus and hosts a range of speaker and workshop events. It supports research and training around the use of new technologies and data flows for model-based inference and prediction of biodiversity distributions and changes at large spatial and taxonomic scales. Flagship Center projects include Map of Life and activities supporting the Half-Earth Map and the development of the GEO BON Species Population Essential Biodiversity Variables. Other initiatives associated with the Center include the integration of macroevolutionary and biogeographic inference (e.g., VertLife, ButterflyNet), NASA-supported remote sensing-informed layers and tools for biodiversity modelling (EarthEnv), the Max Planck-Yale Center on Biodiversity Movement and Global Change, and the Wildlife Insights initiative for camera trapping data.
   
    Yale University offers researchers and staff competitive salaries and a generous package of benefits. Yale has a thriving and growing community of young scholars in ecology, evolution and global change science in the EEB Department, the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies, the Peabody Museum, and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. New Haven is renowned for its classic Ivy League setting, 75 miles northeast of New York City. To apply please send, in one pdf, a short motivation (i.e. cover) letter, CV and names and contact information for three referees to anna.schuerkmann@yale.edu, subject « BGC Postdoc – Bees ». Review of applications will begin on 9 December 2019 and continue until the position is filled.
   
    ———-
 POSTDOC IN BEE POPULATION GENETICS/GENOMICS, UNI HALLE, GERMANY
   
    A research scientist/assistant professor is sought for a ‘TV-L 13’ position (reference No. 5-14238/19-H) to join the Paxton lab at the University of Halle, Germany. Broad research themes of the group are host-parasite interactions, pollination ecology and social evolution: http://www.zoologie.uni-halle.de/allgemeine_zoologie/research/
   
    The group’s taxonomic focus is on insects, particularly bees. It draws heavily on molecular genetics, and research infrastructure is excellent. We seek a highly motivated individual with strong quantitative skills who can work independently to develop a research program in population genetics/genomics and contribute to teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate levels within general zoology. Note that German language skills are required for teaching, though the lab language is English.
   
    Halle is a delightful, historic city of a quarter million people with a large, research-intensive university situated 260 km southwest of Berlin and 40 km from Leipzig. You will be a member of a supportive and dynamic group that interacts closely within and outside the university, including with the DFG-funded biodiversity center iDIV: http://www.idiv-biodiversity.de/idiv-global/?lang=en which is a collaboration of the universities of Halle, Leipzig and Jena.
   
    Applicants must hold a university doctoral degree in biology/population genetics/genomics or a related discipline. Familiarity with insect ecological techniques and data analysis is preferable. Applicants should have a proven track record in publishing high quality scientific papers. Experience in writing grant applications and past success in attracting research funding is of advantage. Knowledge of German is essential for teaching, though the working language of the group is English,. The position is fixed term, initially for 3 years, commencing 1 February 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter, with the possibility of extension for a further 3 years. The salary is at the German standard postdoctoral rate (TV-L 13, 100%). The University of Halle is an equal opportunity employer.
   
    Further details of the position can be obtained from Robert Paxton (email below), to whom applications should be emailed as a single pdf file, to include (i) a letter of motivation, (ii) cv, (iii) list of publications, (iv) list of externally acquired funds, (v) a single page on research achievements and future plans, and (vi) contact details of three referees, by 20 December 2019. Interviews are scheduled for mid-January 2020.
   
    Prof. Robert Paxton
    General Zoology/Institute of Biology
    Uni. Halle, Hoher Weg 8
    D-06120 Halle/Saale
    Germany
    Tel.: +49-345-5526500
    Email: robert.paxton@zoologie.uni-halle.de
   
    ———-
 POSTDOC: COMPARATIVE GENOMICS OF 100 ANT SPECIES, COPENHAGEN
   
    A three-year postdoc position is available at the Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen.
   
    We are looking for a highly motivated researcher for a three-year postdoc position in comparative genomics. The position will be hosted in Villum Centre for Biodiversity Genomics (http://zhanggjlab.org) and will start from 1st May 2020. The deadline of the application is at 31st December 2019.
   
    Project description
    The Global Ant Genomics Consortium (http://antgenomics.dk/) aims to sequence high quality reference genomes for ca. 200 ant species covering the major diversity of Formicidae family. We expect to finish the first 100 genomes by 1st May 2020 and will start organizing the first pilot comparative genomics analyses. All the genomes have been assembled with PacBio long reads and HiC sequencing, thus will be in near chromosome level. This project will perform the comparative genomics analyses with the first 100 ant genomes to reconstruct ant phylogeny and to reveal the genomic changes associated with the evolution of ant social structure, behavior, and lineage-specialized adaptation.


   
    General job description
    * Independently carry out the comparative genomics analyses
    * Coordinate analyses together with other collaborators
    * Limited participation in teaching and dissemination activities of the Centre
   
    Required qualifications
    * A PhD degree within computational biology, ecology and evolution, genomics
    * or related fields
    * Highly experienced on comparative genomics and transcriptomics
    * A convincing publication track record
    * An active interest in insects or ant evolution
    * Fluent spoken and written English
    * Excellent communication skill and ability to work in teams
    * Have experience in working independently and coordinating with other teams
   
    For further employment details, and to apply, please visit: https://candidate.hr-manager.net/ApplicationInit.aspx/?cid=1307&departmentId=18965&ProjectId=150713


   
    Deadline for applications is 31 December 2019
   
    Inquiries about the position can be made to Professor Guojie Zhang; email guojie.zhang@bio.ku.dk.
   
    ———-
 2 PhD POSITIONS: SOCIAL INSECTS AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE, ABERDEEN
   
    Two PhD positions to work on social insects are available in the Lab of Functional Genomics & Sociobiology at the University of Aberdeen, under the supervision of Dr Fabio Manfredini.
   
    The first position deals with the « Origin and maintenance of plasticity in response to thermal stress in invasive and declining ants ». This is a 4 year PhD project, part of a competition funded by EASTBIO BBSRC DTP and in collaboration with Dr Lesley Lancaster (University of Aberdeen), Dr Jenni Stockan (The James Hutton Institute) and Dr Nathan Bailey (Univeristy of St Andrews). The deadline for application is Sunday, January 05, 2020.
   
    The second project instead will investigate « The cost of being a fussy eater – Oligolectic pollinators and environmental change ». This is a 3.5 years project, part of a competition funded by QUADRAT NERC DTP and in collaboration with Dr Lorraine Scott (Queen’s Univeristy Belfast). The deadline for application is Friday, January 24, 2020.
   
    You can find full details about the two projects and how to apply here: https://fmanfredini79.wixsite.com/manfredini/functional-genomics-sociobiology
    Or you can contact Dr Fabio Manfredini directly if you have any question: Email fmanfredini79@gmail.com, Twitter @fmanfredini79
   
    ———-
 GRADUATE POSITION:BEE GENOMICS, HULL
   
    Ecosystem stability and global food security depend upon healthy populations of bees, our foremost pollinators. Bees provide pollination services worth hundreds of billions of pounds annually. Honeybees and bumblebees are our most important managed pollinators, but the UK is home to ~245 species of wild solitary bees which collectively perform most pollination.
   
    Unfortunately, bee populations are declining, with multiple causes. Key to bee survival and fitness is nutrition; all bees feed offspring with pollen gathered from the landscape. But human influences such as agricultural intensification are altering nutritional landscapes for bees [3,4], and fundamentally affecting gene expression, growth and reproduction. Most of what we know about bee nutrition comes from studies in social bees like honeybees or bumblebees [5,6], where nutrition influences caste determination, development, pathogen resistance and others. However, the nutritional ecology of other bees, particularly solitary bees, is largely unstudied. Unless these bees can detect and respond to changes in nutritional landscapes, their fitness will be reduced « V a scenario we term a « nutritional trap ».
   
    Human activity is also changing climates and raising average temperatures. Temperature affects animals’ metabolic rate, physiology, digestion, and nutrient assimilation, as well as gene expression. Dr Gilbert’s recent work [7] has identified the need to store enough carbohydrate and fat to survive the winter as potentially critical for solitary bees’ nutritional ecology. But we know little about how this is regulated, how climate change will affect bees, and how bees will deal with changing nutritional landscapes in a future filled with uncertainty.
   
    We are now, for the first time, in a position to understand not just whether but also how different nutritional landscapes and climates affect bees. This exciting cross-institutional project combines field ecology with cutting edge molecular approaches to address a crucial knowledge gap about how bees are being affected by human-altered nutritional landscapes. This project addresses issues relevant for pure ecological science, conservation biology, agriculture and crop science. At Hull, Dr Gilbert »¦s lab has pioneered rearing protocols for the economically and ecologically important solitary bee, Osmia bicornis. This work is providing an unprecedented window onto bee nutritional ecology. At Leeds, Dr Duncan »¦s lab uses a variety of cutting-edge molecular tools to understand how bees are influenced by their environment. Dr Duncan has conducted groundbreaking work on how nutrition affects gene expression in developing bees, as well as recent work on the environmental and molecular control of reproduction in O. bicornis. The student will capitalise on this timely opportunity to synthesize the research interests of these two research groups and create collaborative links between institutions. The candidate will be integrated into both lab groups and will benefit from the infrastructure and connections at both universities.
   
    Differences in larval nutrition in the honeybee results in gene expression changes and ultimately adult bees with different reproductive potential and lifespan. Using careful manipulations within controlled laboratory environments, the student will first establish how dietary macronutrients affect the fitness of solitary bee larvae in response to changes in rearing temperature. Then, they will use high-throughput sequencing technology to examine genome-wide expression profiles of larvae receiving different diet and temperature treatments, to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying bees »¦ responses to landscape and climate change. Nutritional cues are known to alter gene expression [8], but to date studies have focussed largely on a few genes, and only in honeybees. The student will compare larvae receiving different treatments in (1) choices larvae make about which nutrients to consume, (2) correlates of fitness such as body size and overwinter survival, and (3) expression of growth- versus diapause-related genes. Outcomes: The findings will, firstly, shed light on the optimal nutrition for bees « V both currently, and in a warmer future. They will help inform active measures such as wildflower strips to conserve and promote these vital pollinators as the climate changes. Secondly, results will also show the physiological effects of different nutritional landscapes upon bees, now and in the future, allowing us a detailed understanding of the resilience of solitary bees to landscape change in a changing climate. Finally, the results will provide comparisons and contrasts with existing knowledge of social bee gene expression, physiology and nutrigenomics, providing unparalleled insights into bee nutritional ecology.
   
    References:
    1. Coley P, et al. Oecologia. 2002;133: 62″V69.
    2. Rothman JM, et al. Ecology. 2015;96: 873″V878.
    3. Naug D. Biol Conserv. 2009;142: 2369″V2372.
    4. Donkersley P, et al. Ecol Evol. 2014;4: 4195″V4206.
    5. Paoli PP, et al. Amino Acids. 2014;46: 1449″V1458.
    6. Helm BR, et al. Biol Open. 2017;6: 872″V880.
    7. Austin AJ, Gilbert JDJ. bioRxiv. 2018; https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/397802v1.abstract
    8. Di Pasquale G, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8: e72016.
   
    For details please contact Dr James Gilbert (james.gilbert@hull.ac.uk).
    To apply, and for more details:
    https://panorama-dtp.ac.uk/research/nutrigenomics-and-the-resilience-of-bees-in-a-changing-climate/
    Deadline: 6 Jan 2020
    Eligibility: UK and EU students only
    Funding: UK (NERC, Competition-funded)
   
    ———-
 2 PhD STUDENTSHIPS: THE ECOLOGY OF BEES ON A CHANGING PLANET, IMPERIAL COLLEGE LONDON
   
    1. CONTEXT DEPENDENCE OF DISEASE SPREAD AND VIRULENCE IN A POLLINATOR SYSTEM
    Supervisors: Peter Graystock, Sophie Evison & Richard Gill (secured funding)
    Deadline 13 January 2020
   
    In host-parasite coevolution, the Red Queen hypothesis states that the contest between host and parasite drives continuous adaptation to counter the ever-evolving opposition. Understanding this dynamic is made more complex when external forces intervene to change the environment, particularly anthropogenic activities and the rates at which they occur. The Melissococcus plutonius bacteria is known to be common in honey bees, often without influencing host health. However, unknown triggers can cause this bacteria to express a harmful and often deadly disease known as European foul brood (EFB). This globally distributed disease causes significant damage to the beekeeping industry, and in the UK, EFB is one of only two microbial bee diseases considered so harmful that positive detection requires immediate notification to the authorities. Yet despite the impact of this disease, we currently have little understanding as to what stressors influence the severity and spread of this disease, and if human practices such as land-use change or pesticide application could be influencing the delicate host-parasite interaction.
   
    The student will explore the mechanism behind transmission of the causal bacteria of the disease (Melissococcus plutonius), before determining if key stressors (Land and pesticide use) influence the severity of the disease. This directly-funded studentship will employ a suite of cutting-edge scientific techniques to address questions on what modulates the transmission and virulence of this disease. The project will add substantially to our understanding of the vulnerability of bees to this significantly destructive disease and the results will facilitate the formation of evidence-led disease management strategies. The student will gain a set of interdisciplinary skills including field work, next generation DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, pesticide residue analysis, microbiology and honeybee keeping. The student will gain training and collaboration from leading scientists including supervisor Dr Peter Graystock (Imperial College London), Dr Richard Gill (Imperial College London), and Dr Sophie Evison (University of Nottingham), plus assistance from the National Bee Unit/Defra.
    https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/the-context-dependence-of-disease-spread-and-virulence-in-a-pollinator-system/?p114278


   
    2. ARCTICBUZZ: STUDYING POPULATION DYNAMICS TO UNDERSTAND THE EVOLUTION OF PLANT-POLLINATOR NETWORKS UNDER CLIMATE CHANGE
    Supervisors: Richard Gill, Jacob Johansson & Keith Larson (competitively funded)
    Deadline 6 January 2020
   
    To date our understanding of how insect pollinator declines are influenced by climate change remains limited. For instance, why have some species shown evidence of latitudinal range shifts in apparent response to climate change when others have not? To address this type of question requires us to understand the eco-evolutionary processes by which insect pollinator populations and their host plants are dynamically responding and how this translates to long term changes in the structure of plant-pollinator networks under climate change. Taking a population biology approach, this project will look to understand how bumblebee populations and host plant visitations have changed over the past 50 years for an Arctic bumblebee community in Lapland, Sweden. This will involve understanding how preceding climatic condition has affected population demography of each of 13 species of bumblebee. The study will reveal changes on population trait frequencies over space and time and how resource competition is determined through adaptations to temperature extremes to predict plant-pollinator network structure and the potential for species invasions. Looking at intra- and interannual population and community turnover of the bumblebees and their host plants we will look to inform predictive models under warming scenarios and identify early warning signs of climate change impacts. Furthermore, this project will reveal the spatio-temporal variation (non-static) in the bumblebee-plant visitation network to reveal how resistant and resilient the mutualistic interaction network is to climate change.
   
    The project takes advantage of a unique phenology transect established over a century ago allowing us to compare past data on bumblebee/plant community composition and phenology with contemporary data spanning the major warming over the last five decades. The transect runs along an altitudinal gradient on Mount Nuolja, Abisko, providing a thermal cline with the study taking a space-for-time substitution approach. The student will become experienced in using a number of interdisciplinary techniques, including a variety of fieldwork skills, bee and plant taxonomic identification, molecular methods in DNA barcoding and population genetics, studying bee thermal profiling, managing and analysing big data, skills in ecological network construction, statistics and developing mathematical models to understand extinction vulnerability. The project will involve a significant amount of fieldwork in the Arctic and will require the candidate to be relatively physically fit. This interdisciplinary project will also benefit from co-supervision & collaboration from a number of world-leading scientists, including: Jacob Johansson (Imperial College and Lund University, Sweden); Keith Larson (Umea University, Sweden); Jason Tylianakis (Canterbury University, NZ), Andrew MacDougal (University of Guelph, Canada); Emily Baird (Stockholm University (Sweden).
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Js8pH_9LCJz6pUCkrz97fpSquk73JmKs/view


   
    Where will the PhDs be based?
    The students will based at the Silwood Park campus of Imperial College and hosted by the Gill lab that is well equipped to study bee evolution and ecology. The student will be surrounded by world leading researchers in the disciplines of ecology, evolution and conservation. Facilities include >100 hectares of field site, new controlled environment rooms, microbiology facility, labs tailored for bee research and spacious workspace.
   
    How to apply
    Please send your CV, a one page cover letter explaining why you are suitable for the project, and the names and e-mail addresses of two referees to Dr Peter Graystock p.graystock@imperial.ac.uk by 13th January 2020 for honeybee EFB studentship or Dr Richard Gill r.gill@imperial.ac.uk by 6th January 2020 for ArcticBuzz studentship. Informal enquiries for either are welcomed.
   
    Student eligibility
    Honeybee EFB studentship has secured funding by the CB Dennis British Beekeepers Research Trust and Bee Diseases Insurance Ltd. Applicants should have, or be about to obtain, a Masters qualification and have a 2.1 or higher undergraduate degree in Biology, Ecology, Evolution, Microbiology or similar. Exceptional students at Bachelors level without a Masters will also be considered. Open to UK and EU citizens or applicants with Settled status in the UK. The project will start in September 2020.
   
    ArcticBuzz studentship is competitively funded by NERC. Applicants should have, or be about to obtain, a Masters qualification and have a 2.1 or higher undergraduate degree in Biology, Ecology, Evolution or similar. To be eligible for a full award they must have either British Citizenship, or Settled status in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay, or been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship – (For non-EU citizens, this must not have been in full time education.). This does not apply to UK nationals.
   
    ———-
 PhD: HARD-WIRED FOR SUCCESS? UNRAVELLING GENOMIC SIGNATURES IN POLLINATORS, PLYMOUTH AND THE EARLHAM INSTITUTE, UK
   
    Key information:
    This project has been shortlisted for funding by the ARIES NERC Doctoral Training Partnership, and will involve attendance at mandatory training events throughout the course of the PhD. Successful candidates who meet UKRI’s eligibility criteria will be awarded a NERC studentship – UK and EU nationals who have been resident in the UK for 3 years are eligible for a full award. This studentship will start on 1st October 2020, and the closing date for applications is 12:00 on 7th January 2020. Shortlisted applicants will be interviewed on 18/19 February 2020.
   
    For further information, please contact Mairi Knight: mairi.knight@plymouth.ac.uk
   
    Background:
    Many pollinator species, recognised as essential for ecosystem function, are undergoing rapid declines. One recent exception is the ‘Tree Bumblebee’ Bombus hypnorum: expanding its range into and across the UK in <20 years, it is now one of our most common species.
   
    Building on previous work from the supervisory team, and in collaboration with the Earlham Institute, this project will investigate key genomic differences between this and other bumblebee (Bombus) species to substantially improve our understanding of the factors contributing to its success, along with the declines of others. The project’s focus is a genomic comparison of Bombus species from within the UK and continental Europe. Initial work has identified genomic regions of interest in B. hypnorum that may be indicative of its ability to adapt to anthropogenically altered landscapes. However, current data are preliminary and lack essential phylogenetic comparison.
   
    Methodology:
    This is a timely and exciting opportunity to generate a highly novel, and substantial, genomic dataset to test hypotheses as to whether the observed genomic differences are unique to B. hypnorum, or shared among Bombus species (some evidence suggests elevated resilience in the wider Pyrobombus sub-genus). In addition to fulfilling the specific aims, the data generated will offer the student significant scope to guide the project’s further direction through characterisation of genomic signatures and differences across this important pollinator group.
   
    Training
    The project will equip the successful student with state-of-the-art genomic techniques as well as bioinformatic and modelling skills that are highly transferable and increasingly essential across a wide range of academic and applied biological disciplines. The student will also gain important soft skills (e.g. communication, team working, problem solving). He/she will be based in Plymouth, spending short periods at the other Institutions as relevant.
   
    Person Specification
    The successful candidate will have a biology-based degree, an academic interest in evolutionary ecology, and be enthusiastic about pursuing a laboratory- and computer-based project. Ideally, he/she will have some basic molecular ecology experience (e.g. DNA extraction, PCR) and interest in genetic and evolutionary analysis. Experience of genome sequencing and bioinformatics is not essential as full training will be provided.
   
    Dr Mairi Knight
    mairi.knight@plymouth.ac.uk
    School of Biological and Marine Sciences
    University of Plymouth
    Plymouth
    PL4 8AA
    UK
   
    ———-
 PhD: ANTS AS ECOSYSTEM ENGINEERS, YORK
   
    PhD: Ants as ecosystem engineers: the interaction between niche construction and land management, University of York, UK
   
    We are looking for an enthusiastic and ambitious student to develop a novel project that will use applied field experiments to quantify the relationship between meadow ants and management regimes, and how these together
    affect biodiversity and soil function. The ideal candidate will enjoy interacting with academics and stakeholders from a range of backgrounds and want to apply their scientific training to an important applied question.
   
    Ants act as effective geoengineers, increasing habitat heterogeneity and constructing niches. Yellow meadow ants, Lasius flavus, were historically common on pastures. These ants promote biodiversity, for example they
    increase floral species richness because the ant mound soil differs from surrounding areas. Many modern farming practices reduce or eliminate their populations.
   
    Belton House, a National Trust property including 650 hectares of historic (Grade 1 Registered) wood pasture parkland, which is a UK priority habitat, has areas hosting an unusually high density of meadow ants, but also other areas where they are entirely absent. Previous management of the site has resulted in some areas suffering from over-grazing and soil compaction. The study site is undergoing a period of management change, to a more biodiversity-friendly approach of mixed and lighter grazing. Despite the known importance of ants within the soil ecosystems, very little is known about how the ecosystem impacts of meadow ants are mediated, and how these impacts interact with past and present pasture management practices. The collaboration with CASE partner The National Trust provides the opportunity to carry out controlled experiments, altering management to assess impact on ant populations, and altering ant populations to assess impact on ecosystem composition and function.
   
    This project will be supervised by Elva Robinson (ant behavioural ecologist, University of York), Kelly Redeker (soil biogeochemist, University of York) and Carl Hawke (Nature Conservation Advisor, The National Trust). This is a NERC ACCE DTP studentship. Eligibility: UK/EU applicants only.
   
    Closing date for applications: 8 January 2020
   
    More information:
    https://www.york.ac.uk/biology/postgraduate/research/funding/funded-studentships/


    https://www.york.ac.uk/biology/postgraduate/nercdtp 
    Contact: elva.robinson@york.ac.uk
   
    ———-
 GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY, HOUSTON
   
    The Department of Biology and Biochemistry at the University of Houston (UH) welcomes applications for its graduate program in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology for Fall 2020.  The following faculty in the areas of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology have opportunities available for their labs:
   
    Alex Stewart (astewar6@central.uh.edu): Mathematical biology
    Blaine Cole (bcole@uh.edu): Evolution and social behavior
    Dan Graur (dgraur@uh.edu): Molecular evolutionary bioinformatics
    Diane Wiernasz (dwiernasz@uh.edu): Sexual selection
    Erin Kelleher (eskelleher@uh.edu): Evolutionary genetics and genomics
    Kerri Crawford (kmcrawford3@uh.edu): Community ecology
    Rebecca Zufall (rzufall@uh.edu): Evolutionary genetics
    Ricardo Azevedo (razevedo@uh.edu): Evolutionary genetics
    Rich Meisel (rpmeisel@uh.edu): Evolutionary genetics and genomics
    Steve Pennings (spennings@uh.edu): Community ecology
    Tony Frankino (frankino@uh.edu): Evolution of complex traits
   
    If you are interested, you should look at the relevant faculty members’ web sites and then contact them directly for more information:
    http://www.uh.edu/nsm/biology-biochemistry/people/faculty/faculty-alpha/


   
    For more information regarding the Evolutionary Biology and Ecology graduate program at UH see:
    http://www.bchs.uh.edu/graduate/prospective-students/


    http://www.uh.edu/graduate-school/prospective-students/how-to-apply/


   
    If you have any questions regarding the application process, please contact: Ms. Rosezelia Jackson (biograd@central.uh.edu)
   
    The early deadline for application of prospective students is February 1st, 2020.  Evaluation will continue after that date, but students are encouraged to apply as early as possible.

Offre de thèse : University of Konstanz, Germany

A fully funded position is available to study the social regulation of stinging behaviour of honeybees. Honeybees defend their nest against large predators thanks to a collective effort to harass and sting the intruder. The stinger apparatus has evolved to detach upon stinging elastic skin (such as ours) to maximize venom delivery, but the drawback is that the mutilated bee then dies within a few hours. Thus, the colony under threat must achieve a delicate balance: enough bees need to respond that the intruder is successfully deterred, but without unnecessarily depleting the colony of its workforce. The aim of this project is to understand how this balance is reached. In particular, it focuses on how each individual bee takes the decision to attack or not, depending on the social information that it receives. We aim for an integrative approach, ranging from behavioural experiments and modelling to neuroanatomy and pharmacology.

For more information, please visit https://www.social-neuroethology.com/open-positions/ or contact Morgane Nouvian – morgane.nouvian@uni-konstanz.de

 

Offre de stage : Effet du gradient de fermeture du milieu sur les communautés d’abeilles sauvages dans les ENS de l’Hérault (34)

Contexte et problématique
La pollinisation connait une crise mondiale, qui concerne à la fois les abeilles domestiques et sauvages, ainsi que l’ensemble des insectes pollinisateurs. Les problèmes de la filière apicole a permis de sensibiliser plus largement le grand public au déclin de l’ensemble des insectes pollinisateurs. Ce déclin pose problème à la fois du fait de la contribution notable de ces insectes pour la pollinisation des cultures agricoles, mais aussi en raison de leur rôle crucial pour la pollinisation en général et la conservation des espèces végétales sauvages. Les insectes pollinisateurs sauvages sont plus efficaces et contribuent plus largement à la pollinisation que la seule abeille domestique et le service écosystémique qu’ils rendent n’est pas compensable par la seule apiculture. La prise de conscience mondiale des insuffisances de pollinisation n’a qu’une quinzaine d’années, mais l’ampleur du problème et sa forte médiatisation expliquent la diffusion rapide et large de cette nouvelle préoccupation. Cette situation explique le contexte général, caractérisé par sa perception par le grand public, son appropriation par les ONG environnementales et la recherche scientifique autour des questions de pollinisation.
Á l’échelle du territoire français, il n’existe pas d’études de ce déclin sur l’ensemble des pollinisateurs ; cependant, il existe plusieurs indices d’un déclin similaire des pollinisateurs (bourdons, papillons…), surtout dans les zones d’agriculture intensive. C’est en 2016 que le MEED (Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Énergie et de la Mer) a mis en place un Plan National d’Action (PNA) pour les pollinisateurs intitulé « France, terre de pollinisateurs ». Ce PNA établit clairement que les enjeux de la conservation des insectes pollinisateurs sont majeurs et qu’ils concernent à la fois 1) la préservation de la biodiversité via les services indispensables aux équilibres écosystémiques, et 2) la préservation de la diversité des ressources alimentaires des populations humaines. Ce PNA a également établi la liste de l’ensemble des connaissances à acquérir et à consolider pour agir efficacement, et insiste sur l’action nécessaire de formation et de sensibilisation ainsi que sur l’intérêt de proposer des actions de gestion et de conservation des pollinisateurs. Il est donc urgent de mieux connaitre les pollinisateurs, les facteurs influençant leur présence comme les ressources florales et l’efficacité des mesures de gestion menées en leur faveur.

Objectifs du stage
C’est dans ce contexte que le département de l’Hérault a décidé de mettre en place des actions de gestion en faveur des insectes pollinisateurs et de soutenir des actions de recherche pour mieux comprendre les facteurs environnementaux favorisant leur présence. Ce département est situé en zone méditerranéenne et caractérisé par une diversité d’habitats allant des plages du littoral aux pelouses dolomitiques du Causse du Larzac en passant par les garrigues. Ce département est aussi marqué par une fermeture progressive du paysage par un embroussaillement menant au stade forestier du fait de l’exode rural d’après-guerre. Cependant, l’impact de cette fermeture du paysage sur les communautés d’abeilles sauvages reste mal connu, en particulier en zone méditerranéenne. Dans le cadre de sa politique de conservation des secteurs remarquables de son territoire, ce département a aussi la particularité d’avoir de nombreux Espaces Naturels Sensibles (ENS) et donc de pouvoir mener des actions de conservation en faveur de la biodiversité.
Ce cadre local explique pourquoi l’objectif de ce stage de master sera de caractériser les communautés d’abeilles sauvages le long de gradient de fermeture du paysage, en distinguant des stades herbacés, arbustifs et forestiers. Cette caractérisation sera réalisée dans trois ENS de l’Hérault par capture à la fois au filet et en pièges passifs à différents moments de l’année. Il est envisagé de tester trois types de gradients selon l’espèce forestière dominante, avec surement une forêt de chêne blanc, une de chêne vert et une de résineux (pin d’Alep ou pin noir). De plus, chaque abeille sera associée à l’identification de la plante où elle a été capturée de façon à pouvoir construire le réseau d’interaction plantes-pollinisateurs, et à déterminer les caractères floraux (nectar, morphologie, couleur, odeur…) et les facteurs environnementaux favorisant l’attraction des pollinisateurs. Grâce à une formation à l’identification des abeilles sauvages prévue en début du stage, les abeilles capturées devront être préparées et identifiées au genre pour faciliter l’identification à l’espèce par un expert. Les futurs résultats seront publiables car ils amélioreront la connaissance des abeilles sauvages de ce département et auront des implications sur les futures mesures de gestion en faveur des insectes pollinisateurs.

Profil recherché
• Master 2
• Intérêt pour la démarche scientifique et pour ses applications opérationnelles en conservation
• Intérêt pour les relations plantes-insectes
• Connaissance de la flore méditerranéenne et intérêt pour les abeilles sauvages
• Curiosité, adaptation et rigueur d’analyse pour recueillir et exploiter des données
• Autonomie sur le terrain, initiatives et capacité de travail en équipe
• Capacités relationnelles et rédactionnelles
Conditions
• Lieu : stage basé à Montpellier (laboratoire CEFE)
• Encadrement : Bertrand Schatz (CNRS, CEFE)
• Durée : 6 mois à partir de Février-Mars 2020
• Gratification de stage selon la règlementation
• Voiture personnelle (remboursement des frais) pour les déplacements dans l’Hérault.
• Permis voiture indispensable, véhicule personnel recommandé.

Si ce stage vous intéresse, merci d’envoyer rapidement votre candidature (lettre de motivation + CV) à Bertrand Schatz bertrand.schatz@cefe.cnrs.fr

Offre de stage : University of Hull – BeeGenomics

For details please contact Dr James Gilbert (james.gilbert@hull.ac.uk).

To apply, and for more details:

https://panorama-dtp.ac.uk/research/nutrigenomics-and-the-resilience-of-bees-in-a-changing-climate/

Deadline: 6 Jan 2020

Eligibility: UK and EU students only

Funding: UK (NERC, Competition-funded)

 

Ecosystem stability and global food security depend upon healthy populations of bees, our foremost pollinators. Bees provide pollination services worth hundreds of billions of pounds annually. Honeybees and bumblebees are our most important managed pollinators, but the UK is home to ~245 species of wild solitary bees which collectively perform most pollination.

 

Unfortunately, bee populations are declining, with multiple causes. Key to bee survival and fitness is nutrition; all bees feed offspring with pollen gathered from the landscape. But human influences such as agricultural intensification are altering nutritional landscapes for bees [3,4], and fundamentally affecting gene expression, growth and reproduction. Most of what we know about bee nutrition comes from studies in social bees like honeybees or bumblebees [5,6], where nutrition influences caste determination, development, pathogen resistance and others. However, the nutritional ecology of other bees, particularly solitary bees, is largely unstudied. Unless these bees can detect and respond to changes in nutritional landscapes, their fitness will be reduced ¡V a scenario we term a ¡§nutritional trap¡¨.

 

Human activity is also changing climates and raising average temperatures. Temperature affects animals¡¦ metabolic rate, physiology, digestion, and nutrient assimilation, as well as gene expression. Dr Gilbert¡¦s recent work [7] has identified the need to store enough carbohydrate and fat to survive the winter as potentially critical for solitary bees¡¦ nutritional ecology. But we know little about how this is regulated, how climate change will affect bees, and how bees will deal with changing nutritional landscapes in a future filled with uncertainty.

 

We are now, for the first time, in a position to understand not just whether but also how different nutritional landscapes and climates affect bees. This exciting cross-institutional project combines field ecology with cutting edge molecular approaches to address a crucial knowledge gap about how bees are being affected by human-altered nutritional landscapes. This project addresses issues relevant for pure ecological science, conservation biology, agriculture and crop science.  At Hull, Dr Gilbert¡¦s lab has pioneered rearing protocols for the economically and ecologically important solitary bee, Osmia bicornis. This work is providing an unprecedented window onto bee nutritional ecology. At Leeds, Dr Duncan¡¦s lab uses a variety of cutting-edge molecular tools to understand how bees are influenced by their environment. Dr Duncan has conducted groundbreaking work on how nutrition affects gene expression in developing bees, as well as recent work on the environmental and molecular control of reproduction in O. bicornis. The student will capitalise on this timely opportunity to synthesize the research interests of these two research groups and create collaborative links between institutions. The candidate will be integrated into both lab groups and will benefit from the infrastructure and connections at both universities.

 

Differences in larval nutrition in the honeybee results in gene expression changes and ultimately adult bees with different reproductive potential and lifespan. Using careful manipulations within controlled laboratory environments, the student will first establish how dietary macronutrients affect the fitness of solitary bee larvae in response to changes in rearing temperature. Then, they will use high-throughput sequencing technology to examine genome-wide expression profiles of larvae receiving different diet and temperature treatments, to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying bees¡¦ responses to landscape and climate change. Nutritional cues are known to alter gene expression [8], but to date, studies have focussed largely on a few genes, and only in honeybees. The student will compare larvae receiving different treatments in (1) choices larvae make about which nutrients to consume,

(2) correlates of fitness such as body size and overwinter survival, and (3) expression of growth- versus diapause-related genes.  Outcomes:

The findings will, firstly, shed light on the optimal nutrition for bees ¡V both currently, and in a warmer future. They will help inform active measures such as wildflower strips to conserve and promote these vital pollinators as the climate changes. Secondly, results will also show the physiological effects of different nutritional landscapes upon bees, now and in the future, allowing us a detailed understanding of the resilience of solitary bees to landscape change in a changing climate. Finally, the results will provide comparisons and contrast with existing knowledge of social bee gene expression, physiology and nutrigenomics, providing unparalleled insights into bee nutritional ecology.

 

References:

  1. Coley P, et al. Oecologia. 2002;133: 62¡V69.
  2. Rothman JM, et al. Ecology. 2015;96: 873¡V878.
  3. Naug D. Biol Conserv. 2009;142: 2369¡V2372.
  4. Donkersley P, et al. Ecol Evol. 2014;4: 4195¡V4206.
  5. Paoli PP, et al. Amino Acids. 2014;46: 1449¡V1458.
  6. Helm BR, et al. Biol Open. 2017;6: 872¡V880.
  7. Austin AJ, Gilbert JDJ. bioRxiv. 2018;

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/397802v1.abstract

  1. Di Pasquale G, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8: e72016.

 

Dr James Gilbert | +44 1482 465486 | james.gilbert@hull.ac.uk | jdjgilbert.wordpress.com Lecturer & Programme Director for Zoology, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Cottingham Rd, Hull HU6 7RX | *I work from home on Thursdays* « I am dying by inches, for lack of anyone to talk to about insects.. » Darwin, diary entry

 

James D Gilbert <James.Gilbert@hull.ac.uk>

Offre de thèse : Origin and maintenance of plasticity in response to thermal stress in invasive and declining ants

PhD position to work on social insects is available in the Lab of Functional Genomics & Sociobiology at the University of Aberdeen, under the supervision of Dr Fabio Manfredini.

« Origin and maintenance of plasticity in response to thermal stress in invasive and declining ants ».

This is a 4 year PhD project, part of a competition funded byEASTBIO BBSRC DTPand in collaboration withDr Lesley Lancaster(University of Aberdeen),Dr JenniStockan(The James Hutton Institute) andDr Nathan Bailey(Univeristy of St Andrews). The deadline for application is Sunday, January 05, 2020.

You can find full details and how to apply here:

https://fmanfredini79.wixsite.com/manfredini/functional-genomics-sociobiology

Or you can contact Dr Fabio Manfredini directly if you have any question:

Email fmanfredini79@gmail.com, Twitter@fmanfredini79

 

 

Fabio Manfredini (BSc; MSc, PhD)

 

Postdoctoral Research Associate

School of Biological Sciences

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Royal Holloway, University of London

Egham, TW20 0EX

 

Cell.: +44 07852416104

e-Mail: fabio.manfredini@rhul.ac.uk

Skype: fabio.manfredini2

Webpage: www.fmanfredini79.wixsite.com/manfredini

 

Fabio Manfredini <fmanfredini79@gmail.com>

Offre de thèse : Ageing in social animals

PhD: AGEING IN SOCIAL ANIMALS, UEA

 

PHD STUDENTSHIP OPPORTUNITY: The ageing bee: how does sociality affect ageing in social animals?

PhD to study sociality and ageing in bumble bees at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Supervisors: Andrew Bourke (a.bourke@uea.ac.uk), Alex Maklakov, Tracey Chapman (all UEA)

 

Closing date for applications: TUESDAY 7 JANUARY 2020

 

A PhD studentship to start in October 2020 is now open for applications. Using the bumble bee Bombus terrestris, the student will employ experimental and genetic methods to test whether, in social organisms, longevity and ageing depend primarily on properties of the individual or group. Applicants will be competitively selected for funding of the studentship by the ARIES NERC Doctoral Training Partnership (https://www.aries-dtp.ac.uk/).

 

For further details of the project (BOURKEUBIO20ARIES) and instructions on how to apply, see: https://www.aries-dtp.ac.uk/studentships/bourke/

Posted 13/11/2019

 

Offre de stage : Ant gene evolution

GRADUATE POSITION: ANT GENE EVOLUTION, FLORIDA

 

Interested in Genetic and Epigenetic Basis of Social Evolution? Apply for Graduate School at the University of Florida (UF)

The Yan Lab in the UF Biology is seeking graduate researchers to study how evolutionary expansion of receptor genes and diversity of sensory neurons in ants regulate their social communication and interaction with ecological environment, as well as how behavioral plasticity and reproductive longevity were evolved in eusocial insects.

Information on Dr. Yans research and articles can be found: https://biology.ufl.edu/hua-yan/ www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28802043(Odorant Receptor) www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25200663(Behavioral Epigenetics)

 

Interested students are strongly recommended to apply for the graduate school at the University of Florida for Fall 2020. The deadline for applications to UF Biology is December 1. If you are interested, please contact me via email: hua.yan@ufl.edu

 

More information can be found at the website: https://biology.ufl.edu/graduate/application/

 

The University of Florida is an Equal Opportunity Institution. Individuals from under-represented groups in STEM are particularly encouraged to apply.

 

Hua Yan, Ph.D.

Department of Biology,University of Florida

882 Newell Dr., 511 Carr Hall

PO Box 118525

Gainesville, FL 32611

Phone:352-273-4983

Offres thèse et Stage M2 : Pollinator health & bee abundance, Virginia tech

POLLINATOR HEALTH & BEE ABUNDANCE, VIRGINIA TECH

 

The Couvillon Lab and the O’Rourke Lab, both at Virginia Tech, seek 2 (1 Ph.D., 1 M.S./Ph.D.) highly motivated students with a keen interest in pollinator health & native bee abundance and diversity to join our research groups. Students will begin in Fall 2020 or Winter 2021.

 

The Ph.D. student will be under the main supervision of Dr. Margaret Couvillon, Assistant Professor of Pollinator Biology and Ecology in the Department of Entomology, and co-advised by Dr. Megan O’Rourke, Associate Professor in the School of Plant and Environmental Sciences. The M.S./Ph.D. student will be under the main supervision of Dr. O’Rourke and co-advised by Dr. Couvillon.

 

Available positions: One Ph.D. (4 years) and one M.S./Ph.D. (2 or 4 years) positions studying the survival, fitness, and performance of native and wild bees and pollinator communities and their abundance and diversity across different landscapes. Students should have a keen interest in native bee abundance and diversity and pollinator health in general.

 

* Expertise and/or interest in bee taxonomy and identification would be extremely helpful.

 

Application deadline: 1 DECEMBER, 2019, with video interviews in January 2020 and a decision in early February 2020.

 

Start date: Preferably Fall 2020 for Ph.D. student and Winter 2021 for M.S. student, but this is open to some negotiation.

 

Background: Lack of forage is a factor contributing to bee declines. This stressor can act directly, where hungry bees are unable to meet their nutritional needs, or indirectly, where the resulting nutritional stress reduces the bees’ ability to cope with other stressors like diseases and pesticides. Media coverage has been wide, and as a consequence, everyone wants to feed hungry bees. Such help is offered with best intentions, but efficacy is undermined by two crucial knowledge gaps: firstly, we do not fully understand the foraging dynamics of bees across diverse landscapes because the current methods of surveying, cataloging, and comparing floral abundance at a landscape-scale is intensely time-consuming. Secondly, nutritional stress is often studied either in honey bees (Apis mellifera spp.) or non-honey bees, creating a dichotomy that limits the usefulness of resulting recommendations. Thus, there is a critical need to develop new methods to survey forage on a landscape scale and whether a good landscape for feeding one type of bee is also a good landscape for feeding other bees. Only with such data may we implement a best management strategy for improving food availability to benefit overall pollinator health in a meaningful, targeted way.

 

These new studentships are part of a larger, 5 year ongoing project funded by FFAR (Foundation for Food and Agricultural Research), with Lead PI Couvillon and co-PIs O’Rourke, Taylor, and Schurch, all at Virginia Tech.

 

Potential applied and basic science projects may include these questions:

– What landscape characteristics are most associated with overall pollinator health?

– How does pollinator community diversity and abundance vary with landscapes?

– How does stressor exposure, such as to pesticides, affect abundance, diversity, and health of non-Apis bees?

– What plant communities are associated with landscapes that support diverse and abundant pollinator communities?

– How do honey bee foraging dynamics, as determined by previous work, relate to the abundance, diversity, and health of non-Apis bees? In other words, are honey bees good bioindicators for native and wild bee pollinators?

 

M.S. requirements:

– BS in Biology, Entomology, Landscape Ecology or related STEM field

– Fulfillment of requirements set out by the Department of Entomology at Virginia Tech and The School of Plant and Environmental Sciences

– An excitement for working with live, whole organisms (that sting!)

– A willingness to learn new skills, such as experimental design, scientific reproducibility, statistics, GIS, and insect identification

– Proficiency in English and excellent verbal and written communication skills

– A collaborative, helpful, team-oriented spirit

 

Additional Ph.D. requirements:

– An MS in Biology, Entomology, Landscape Ecology, or related STEM field or significant research experience, preferably with peer reviewed publications.

– Fulfillment of requirements set out by the Department of Entomology at Virginia Tech and The School of Plant and Environmental Sciences

– If you are from an international location where English is not your first language, you will be required to take the TOEFL (see Graduate School requirements)

 

Please note that the selected candidates for the positions must then apply and be accepted into the Graduate School at Virginia Tech. Virginia Tech is an equal opportunity employer.

 

We offer:

– A funded position (Ph.D. or M.S./Ph.D) working with economically vital and scientifically fascinating insects. The Ph.D. student will be supported at Step 12, whereas the M.S. student will be supported at Step 10.

– Training as a well-rounded, critically-thinking scientist

– Exciting combination of field studies and experiments with freely flying and behaving bees; new methods in video and landscape analysis with ArcGIS; opportunities to learn experimental design, scientific reproducibility, and statistical modelling

– Regular collaborations with other research teams in the department, university, and within the larger field

– A Departmental instructional program offering a variety of basic and applied courses

 

Blacksburg is a lovely college town set between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains with many outdoor opportunities, high standard of living, and a warm and welcoming community feel.

 

Application:

Please email your application to both Dr. Couvillon and Dr. O’Rourke as a single pdf attachment. Application should include a cover letter (1-2 pages) introducing yourself and describing your background and research interests, a CV (please include your undergraduate and/or graduate GPA, as these are requirements for entrance into the graduate school), GRE scores (if available – note that Entomology does not require GRES), and the contact information for two potential academic references before 1 December, 2019. Please remember to indicate which position interests you. A short list of candidates will be invited to interview over Skype in January 2020, and selection should occur by February 2020.

 

For more details on the research and our lab, please see www.freelyflyingbees.com or contact Dr. Maggie Couvillon (mjc@vt.edu) or Dr. Megan O’Rourke (megorust@vt.edu) directly. You may also « Join » our Facebook page The BeeGroup @ VT.

 

References

Couvillon, Schürch & Ratnieks (2014). Dancing bees communicate a foraging preference for rural lands in High Level Agri-Environment Schemes. Current Biol 24(11), 1212-1215.

Couvillon, Schürch & Ratnieks (2014) Waggle dance distances as integrative indicators of seasonal foraging challenges. PLOS One, 9 (4), e93495.

Couvillon & Ratnieks (2015). Environmental consultancy: dancing bee bioindicators to evaluate landscape « health ». Frontiers in Ecol and Evol 3, 44.